Tagged: astronomy

Massive sunspots and huge solar flares mean unexpected space weather for Earth - Guest Work

Guest Work Sep 08, 2017

By Alexa Halford, Dartmouth College; Brett Carter, RMIT University, and Julie Currie, RMIT University If you still have your solar viewing glasses from the eclipse, now is a good time to slap them on and look up at the sun. You’ll see two big dark areas visible on our star. These massive sunspots are … Read More

Considering the Character of Galaxies - A History of NZ Science in 25 Objects

Jean Balchin Jul 04, 2017

One day, when I was seven years old, I decided to camp out in the treehouse with my brother John. It was a poorly planned venture from the start; we misjudged the cold, the ferocity of the mosquitoes and our own temperaments. John got spooked looking at the gnarled bark of the tree, reading faces … Read More

Matariki: reintroducing the tradition of Māori New Year celebrations - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 30, 2017

Rangi Matamua, Waikato University The Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, is one of the most obvious star groups in the night sky, identifiable to the naked eye. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the star cluster is known as Matariki. This name is a truncated version of the saying “Ngā mata o te ariki Tāwhirimātea” meaning “the eye of the god … Read More

Seven Earth-sized planets discovered orbiting a nearby star - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 23, 2017

By Jonti Horner, University of Southern Queensland An international team of astronomers has found that a nearby star is accompanied by a swarm of at least seven small, rocky worlds. One of the eyecatching claims in the work, published today in Nature, is that in the appropriate circumstances, there is a chance that any (or all) the … Read More

How far they’ll go: Moana shows the power of Polynesian celestial navigation - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 16, 2017

By Duane W. Hamacher, Monash University and Carla Bento Guedes, UNSW One of the greatest feats of human migration in history was the colonisation of the vast Pacific Ocean by Polynesian peoples. They achieved it thanks to their sophisticated knowledge of positional astronomy and celestial navigation. The Disney film Moana has drawn attention to … Read More

Astronomical Travels: Stellar science on show - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 03, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. Every conference has his favourite themes, which are the “hottest” things of the day. For IAUS329, there were several ones, plus some soft controversies (we won’t fight … Read More

Astronomical Travels: Organising a conference - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 30, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. A meeting wouldn’t exist without organisers. Of course there are the committees (the local and scientific ones) which help, but an overall guide is needed. For … Read More

Astronomical travels: From the land of chocolate to Aotearoa - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 08, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. Attending a scientific congress – a classic activity for a researcher. Of course it helps to keep up to date with the latest discoveries, but it … Read More

What the universe looks like when viewed with radio eyes - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 28, 2016

Natasha Hurley-Walker, Curtin University To the naked eye, the universe we can see on a clear night is dotted with thousands of stars, but what would it look like if human eyes could see radio waves? Deep in the Western Australian outback a radio telescope is demonstrating just that by painting a picture of the cosmos in all … Read More