Tagged: astronomy

Proxima b: the Earth next door? - News

John Kerr Aug 25, 2016

The astronomy world is abuzz following the discovery of a planet in a neighboring star system, sitting in just the right position to – theoretically – host liquid water.  It is still over four light years away, but the planet Proxima b in the Alpha Centauri system is the closest Earth-like planet we’ve found. The discovery is published today in the journal Nature. Read More

Second detection heralds the era of gravitational wave astronomy - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 16, 2016

By Paul Lasky, Monash University Earlier this year, a team of over 1,000 scientists from across the globe announced the first discovery of gravitational waves and the first ever observation of colliding black holes. That same team has now published a second gravitational-wave observation from another cataclysmic black hole death spiral, detected on Boxing Day, December … Read More

NZ scientists join ambitious search of the cosmos - News

Erica Mather Jun 08, 2016

Scientists from the University of Auckland have signed up to join the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project, one of the most ambitious astronomy projects ever undertaken. The LSST is a purpose-built telescope equipped with the world’s largest digital camera at 3,200-megapixels, which is able to take snapshots of the night sky the size of 40 full moons. The … Read More

Kiwis join major astronomy project underway in the Chilean mountains - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 07, 2016

By Professor Richard Easther This week, the University of Auckland (where I work) announced it is joining the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope collaboration. So what is the LSST, what will it do, and why are we so excited about it?  Firstly, the LSST is, as the name suggests, a telescope. Currently under construction in the Chilean Andes, it is scheduled to see “first light” in … Read More

Saturn’s moons may be younger than the dinosaurs – so could life really exist there? - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 30, 2016

David Rothery, The Open University Saturn is home to more than 60 moons – from the massive Titan and the crater-riddled Phoebe, to Enceladus with its geysers. Enceladus in particular has been put forward as a good candidate for harbouring microbial life, thanks to its warm internal ocean. After all, if intelligent life … Read More

Astronomy: A Voyage of Discovery - Micro to Macro

Ryan Ridden Feb 09, 2016

Astronomy is a subject of exploration. In an age where the Earth has been charted from the Old World to the New, it almost seems like the age of great voyages of exploration and discovery have long passed. That stands true as long as you don’t look up at night. On a clear night it becomes painfully clear there is much … Read More

The forgotten moon landing that paved the way for today’s space adventures - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 03, 2016

Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Crashing into a planet is seldom a good idea. If you’re trying to travel to another world, you’re likely to land at tens of kilometres per second unless you do something serious to slow down. When Neil Armstrong famously became the first man on the moon in 1969, he piloted a lunar module … Read More