Tagged: astronomy

Matariki: reintroducing the tradition of Māori New Year celebrations - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 30, 2017

Rangi Matamua, Waikato University The Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, is one of the most obvious star groups in the night sky, identifiable to the naked eye. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the star cluster is known as Matariki. This name is a truncated version of the saying “Ngā mata o te ariki Tāwhirimātea” meaning “the eye of the god … Read More

Seven Earth-sized planets discovered orbiting a nearby star - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 23, 2017

By Jonti Horner, University of Southern Queensland An international team of astronomers has found that a nearby star is accompanied by a swarm of at least seven small, rocky worlds. One of the eyecatching claims in the work, published today in Nature, is that in the appropriate circumstances, there is a chance that any (or all) the … Read More

How far they’ll go: Moana shows the power of Polynesian celestial navigation - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 16, 2017

By Duane W. Hamacher, Monash University and Carla Bento Guedes, UNSW One of the greatest feats of human migration in history was the colonisation of the vast Pacific Ocean by Polynesian peoples. They achieved it thanks to their sophisticated knowledge of positional astronomy and celestial navigation. The Disney film Moana has drawn attention to … Read More

Astronomical Travels: Stellar science on show - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 03, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. Every conference has his favourite themes, which are the “hottest” things of the day. For IAUS329, there were several ones, plus some soft controversies (we won’t fight … Read More

Astronomical Travels: Organising a conference - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 30, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. A meeting wouldn’t exist without organisers. Of course there are the committees (the local and scientific ones) which help, but an overall guide is needed. For … Read More

Astronomical travels: From the land of chocolate to Aotearoa - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 08, 2016

In this guest post series astronomer Dr Yaël Nazé details her experience traveling from Belgium to New Zealand for the International Astronomy Union Symposia – The Lives and Death-Throes of Massive Stars. Attending a scientific congress – a classic activity for a researcher. Of course it helps to keep up to date with the latest discoveries, but it … Read More

What the universe looks like when viewed with radio eyes - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 28, 2016

Natasha Hurley-Walker, Curtin University To the naked eye, the universe we can see on a clear night is dotted with thousands of stars, but what would it look like if human eyes could see radio waves? Deep in the Western Australian outback a radio telescope is demonstrating just that by painting a picture of the cosmos in all … Read More

Proxima b: the Earth next door? - News

John Kerr Aug 25, 2016

The astronomy world is abuzz following the discovery of a planet in a neighboring star system, sitting in just the right position to – theoretically – host liquid water.  It is still over four light years away, but the planet Proxima b in the Alpha Centauri system is the closest Earth-like planet we’ve found. The discovery is published today in the journal Nature. Read More

Second detection heralds the era of gravitational wave astronomy - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 16, 2016

By Paul Lasky, Monash University Earlier this year, a team of over 1,000 scientists from across the globe announced the first discovery of gravitational waves and the first ever observation of colliding black holes. That same team has now published a second gravitational-wave observation from another cataclysmic black hole death spiral, detected on Boxing Day, December … Read More