Tagged: astronomy

Saturn’s moons may be younger than the dinosaurs – so could life really exist there? - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 30, 2016

David Rothery, The Open University Saturn is home to more than 60 moons – from the massive Titan and the crater-riddled Phoebe, to Enceladus with its geysers. Enceladus in particular has been put forward as a good candidate for harbouring microbial life, thanks to its warm internal ocean. After all, if intelligent life … Read More

Astronomy: A Voyage of Discovery - Micro to Macro

Ryan Ridden Feb 09, 2016

Astronomy is a subject of exploration. In an age where the Earth has been charted from the Old World to the New, it almost seems like the age of great voyages of exploration and discovery have long passed. That stands true as long as you don’t look up at night. On a clear night it becomes painfully clear there is much … Read More

The forgotten moon landing that paved the way for today’s space adventures - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 03, 2016

Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Crashing into a planet is seldom a good idea. If you’re trying to travel to another world, you’re likely to land at tens of kilometres per second unless you do something serious to slow down. When Neil Armstrong famously became the first man on the moon in 1969, he piloted a lunar module … Read More

Past claims about new planets were wrong – why ‘Planet Nine’ may be different - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 26, 2016

Andrew Coates, UCL There’s a real buzz among planetary scientists after a new study suggested that an unseen planet, dubbed ‘Planet Nine’, of about ten times the Earth’s mass could be lurking in the Kuiper belt, a band of icy objects beyond Neptune. The latest theory was put forward after scientists noticed that six objects in … Read More

Micro to Macro - Micro to Macro

Ryan Ridden Jan 13, 2016

In our universe the incredibly tiny and the absolutely enormous are intertwined. In our everyday life there appears to be a clear distinction between the microscopic and macroscopic worlds, however, in many ways this is an illusion. We can begin to see how the two worlds connect by looking at the fundamental rules of the universe, as uncovered by physics … Read More

Could life on an exoplanet spread to its neighbour? - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 04, 2015

David Rothery, The Open University Imagine two nearby exoplanets orbiting the same sun, each with its own indigenous civilisation. They’re going through history either as companionable neighbours or deadly rivals. This is a familiar situation in science fiction, but could it ever happen? With the rapidly growing number of habitable exoplanets being discovered, this scenario may seem … Read More