Tagged: bacteria

How plastic-eating bacteria actually work – a chemist explains - Guest Work

Guest Author May 01, 2018

Emily Flashman, Research Fellow in Enzymology, University of Oxford This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The plastic bottles we throw away today will be around for hundreds of years. It’s one of the key reasons why the mounting plastic pollution problem, which is having a deadly effect on … Read More

Menstrual cups: let’s investigate! - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Apr 29, 2018

After finding that there really have been bugger all studies done on menstrual cups and toxic shock, microbiologist Siouxsie Wiles ponders whether crowdfunding and open science might be the solution. Last week a new lab-based study came out about menstrual cups and toxic shock syndrome, the very rare but potentially deadly result of infection with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Read More

The recent ‘period in a bag’ study: what it can and can’t tell us about menstrual cups and toxic shock - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Apr 29, 2018

Recently, a lab-based study was published about menstrual cups, tampons, and toxic shock syndrome. In this post, microbiologist Siouxsie Wiles reflects on what the study can and can’t tell us about menstrual cups and toxic shock. If you need reminding, toxic shock syndrome is a very rare complication of a bacterial infection that can quickly result in organ failure … Read More

‘Super gonorrhoea’ raises the stakes in the war against superbugs - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 06, 2018

Mark Blaskovich, The University of Queensland There has been a lot of news over the past few weeks about the rise of superbugs and antibiotic overuse, including a nasty sexually transmitted infection in the United Kingdom. A British man is the first in the world to be diagnosed with a strain of gonorrhoea resistant to all strains … Read More

Health Check: what caused my stye and can I get rid of it? - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 07, 2018

James Armitage, Deakin University and Jacqueline Kirkman, Deakin University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Many of us will have a stye in our lifetime. While they can be quite sore, the concern for most is the aesthetics of a swollen and red eyelid, especially as it’s hard … Read More

How does a Virus-Blocking Bacterium operate in Mosquitoes? - News

Jean Balchin Mar 05, 2018

A recent study published in PLOS Pathogens has revealed more details of the mechanism by which the bacterium Wolbachia blocks viruses in mosquito cells. Professor Scott O’Neill, Director of the World Mosquito Program, led by Australia’s Monash University, and colleagues argue that the mechanism reduces viral replication inside cells and that rapid degradation of viral RNA is involved.  What is Wolbachia?  Wolbachia is a genus of gram-negative … Read More

New research suggests common herbicides are linked to antibiotic resistance - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 24, 2017

By Jack Heinemann, University of Canterbury.  Antibiotics are losing their ability to kill bacteria. One of the main reasons for the rise in antibiotic resistance is the improper use of antibiotics, but our latest research shows that the ingredients in commonly-used weed killers like Round-up and Kamba can also cause bacteria to become less susceptible to … Read More

Earth Microbiome Project: crowd-sourcing the world’s bacteria - News

John Kerr Nov 02, 2017

A genetic database of over 27,000 bacterial samples from around the world – including New Zealand – will keep researchers busy for years to come. Cataloging the bacterial diversity of the entire planet? Given that microbes are basically everywhere, this seems like an impossible task. But an international team of researchers is taking on the challenge. The Earth Microbiome … Read More

DNA shows tiny tardigrades are just as cool as we thought - News

Jean Balchin Jul 28, 2017

New genome sequences have revealed exciting new information about the origins of tardigrades as well as the genes that underlie their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions.  A team of researchers led by Mark Blaxter and Kazuharu Arakawa from the universities of Edinburgh, Scotland and Keio, Japan respectively, have carefully stitched together the DNA code for two … Read More

Is it time to drop “complete the course” message for antibiotics? - News

Jean Balchin Jul 27, 2017

The commonly held belief that patients should “complete the course” of antibiotics to avoid antibiotic resistance is not backed by evidence and should be dropped, argue experts in The BMJ (The British Medical Journal) today. According to Professor Martin Llewelyn at Brighton and Sussex Medical School and colleagues, patients are actually put at unnecessary risk from antibiotic resistance when treatment is given … Read More