Tagged: behaviour

Why short ‘unconscious bias’ programs aren’t enough to end racial harassment and discrimination - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 30, 2018

Victor Sojo, University of Melbourne and Melissa A. Wheeler, University of Melbourne This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. An evaluation of 40 years of research has found that diversity training workshops have only a small effect in reducing bias against members of minority groups. The research also … Read More

Despite living amongst plants with large seeds, extinct giant moa dispersed only tiny seeds - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 26, 2018

Jo Carpenter This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. When the giant moa of New Zealand were hunted to extinction about five centuries ago, the disappearance of the birds themselves was one of several losses. There were nine species of moa that ranged in size from 15 to 250 kilograms. Moa … Read More

Why bodycam footage might not clear things up … - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 05, 2018

Deryn Strange, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Kristyn Jones, John Jay College of Criminal Justice This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Stephon Clark, an African-American man, was killed by Sacramento police in his grandmother’s backyard last month, setting off protests and conflict over the police’s … Read More

Future tense: how the language you speak influences your willingness to take climate action - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 12, 2018

Astghik Mavisakalyan, Curtin University; Clas Weber, University of Western Australia, and Yashar Tarverdi, Curtin University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Does the language we speak influence how much we care about the environment? Our new research suggests that the answer is yes. Speakers of … Read More

Our psychological biases mean order matters when we judge items in sequence - News

Guest Author Feb 15, 2018

Robin Kramer, University of Lincoln This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. We often need to make decisions about sequences of things or people rather than just a single item in isolation. For instance, in an everyday setting, we might choose which smartphone to buy after trying out several. There are … Read More

Your next hearing aid could be a video game - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 08, 2018

Dana Boebinger, Harvard University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Roughly 15 percent of Americans report some sort of hearing difficulty; trouble understanding conversations in noisy environments is one of the most common complaints. Unfortunately, there’s not much doctors or audiologists can do. Hearing aids can amplify things for … Read More

Global study finds women hold different views of harassment - News

Jean Balchin Feb 08, 2018

A recent survey of 1,734 female undergraduate students across 12 countries has revealed that women have different perceptions of inappropriate behaviour by men across 47 different categories. For example, Australian woman are less likely to consider wolf-whistling in the street, being asked for sex at a social event and a man overstaying his welcome in their home as unacceptable behaviour than … Read More

Why can’t cats resist thinking inside the box? - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 06, 2018

Nicholas Dodman, Tufts University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Twitter’s been on fire with people amazed by cats that seem compelled to park themselves in squares of tape marked out on the floor. These felines appear powerless to resist the call of the #CatSquare. This social media fascination … Read More

What do we know about how young women think about food at school? - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal Nov 02, 2017

In this episode of the Psychology Report, I talk to Dr. Eva Neely, a lecturer at the School of Public Health at Massey University in Wellington, New Zealand. She has done some groundbreaking research on the social health meanings of food for youth in schools – which is a step away from the usual health-focused approach used when trying to … Read More

What a hoot! Cheeky kea ‘laughter’ sets off playful antics - News

John Kerr Mar 21, 2017

A warbling kea squawk has been shown to trigger playful behaviour in the cheeky native parrot, which researchers have compared to laughter in humans. Kea are playful birds. They perform aerial acrobatics, chase each other through the air and have jostling play-fights on the ground.  Researchers noticed that in the midst of such behaviour kea screech a particular ‘play call.’ After documenting these … Read More