Tagged: biology

Data should smash the biological myth of promiscuous males and sexually coy females - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 17, 2018

Zuleyma Tang-Martinez, University of Missouri-St. Louis. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. That males are naturally promiscuous while females are coy and choosy is a widely held belief. Even many scientists – including some biologists, psychologists and anthropologists – tout this notion when interviewed by the media … Read More

From testosterone to dogs, and physics for babies: five fascinating books in 2017 - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 20, 2017

George Aranda, Deakin University In my mild-mannered persona as an academic in science education, I teach and research ways that science can be better taught in Australia and globally. But every year I also explore the world of science books. I scope what’s new and interesting for my not-for-profit science book blog, and the Big Ideas … Read More

Fonterra’s blindspot – synthetic milk - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Oct 13, 2017

Last year I found myself sitting on a plane beside a Fonterra executive who was bound for Chicago, where the dairy giant’s US operation is based. I asked him what he considered to be the biggest issues the company faced. He immediately mentioned “trace-ability” and giving Fonterra’s customers confidence in the safety of its products, something that is rightly … Read More

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

The Science of Coffee Naps (And Why You Should Take Them) - Up and Atom

Kimberley Collins Sep 04, 2016

Do you find yourself struggling to stay awake in the middle of the afternoon? Research shows having a coffee nap, where you drink cup of coffee and taking a 20 minute nap, is the most effective way to restore your energy.  Many of us know this feeling… (Photo by Wikimedia Commons) The “coffee nap” strategy is a great way to maximise the effect … Read More

Cyclostomes: marine survivors from the Jurassic - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 15, 2016

by Professor Abby Smith, Department of Marine Science, University of Otago Imagine if you found a creature that dropped a couple of fertilised eggs into a pouch and a week or two later gave birth to hundreds of babies.  Only a very few insects (and, oddly, armadillos) do this on land.  In the sea, only one kind of creature can … Read More

Ant-tastic science - Pointing At Science

Steve Pointing Mar 23, 2016

There have been several recent scientific papers about ants that really caught my eye. I share some thoughts on these below, or you can listen to my Dear Science podcast this week for more on these stories. War and Peace – ant style African acacia ants build their colonies in trees and are well known … Read More

Meet the new must-have pet - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf Oct 20, 2015

*Please see end of post for details of an incentivised research survey on science blogs we’d love you to participate in. I have a crazily adorable house bunny called Acorn, who is about to become a celeb-bunny on another Sciblogs site. Acorn is exponentially more lovely than our previous rabbit, Daisy, who came to us second-hand and possibly treated sub-optimally. Read More

A nose for the future - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Oct 23, 2014

It’s been a big time for noses recently. Who would have picked that? First up, a paper in PLOS ONE  indicated that losing one’s sense of smell may be a predictor (statistically speaking) of your demise (at least if you are older than 57). The authors speculate Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year … Read More