Tagged: biology

Fonterra’s blindspot – synthetic milk - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Oct 13, 2017

Last year I found myself sitting on a plane beside a Fonterra executive who was bound for Chicago, where the dairy giant’s US operation is based. I asked him what he considered to be the biggest issues the company faced. He immediately mentioned “trace-ability” and giving Fonterra’s customers confidence in the safety of its products, something that is rightly … Read More

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

The Science of Coffee Naps (And Why You Should Take Them) - Up and Atom

Kimberley Collins Sep 04, 2016

Do you find yourself struggling to stay awake in the middle of the afternoon? Research shows having a coffee nap, where you drink cup of coffee and taking a 20 minute nap, is the most effective way to restore your energy.  Many of us know this feeling… (Photo by Wikimedia Commons) The “coffee nap” strategy is a great way to maximise the effect … Read More

Cyclostomes: marine survivors from the Jurassic - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 15, 2016

by Professor Abby Smith, Department of Marine Science, University of Otago Imagine if you found a creature that dropped a couple of fertilised eggs into a pouch and a week or two later gave birth to hundreds of babies.  Only a very few insects (and, oddly, armadillos) do this on land.  In the sea, only one kind of creature can … Read More

Ant-tastic science - Pointing At Science

Steve Pointing Mar 23, 2016

There have been several recent scientific papers about ants that really caught my eye. I share some thoughts on these below, or you can listen to my Dear Science podcast this week for more on these stories. War and Peace – ant style African acacia ants build their colonies in trees and are well known … Read More

Meet the new must-have pet - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf Oct 20, 2015

*Please see end of post for details of an incentivised research survey on science blogs we’d love you to participate in. I have a crazily adorable house bunny called Acorn, who is about to become a celeb-bunny on another Sciblogs site. Acorn is exponentially more lovely than our previous rabbit, Daisy, who came to us second-hand and possibly treated sub-optimally. Read More

A nose for the future - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Oct 23, 2014

It’s been a big time for noses recently. Who would have picked that? First up, a paper in PLOS ONE  indicated that losing one’s sense of smell may be a predictor (statistically speaking) of your demise (at least if you are older than 57). The authors speculate Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year … Read More

One example of why all those genomes from different species are useful to biologists - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Oct 14, 2012

In this video scientists give an example of how knowing the genomes and biology of many species can be put to use. It also gives some idea why biologists do a lot of work on so-called ‘model’ organisms - species that particular functions can be studied closely. The scientists in the video wanted to locate genes that … Read More