Tagged: biology

Book Review: The Tale of Mrs Possum – A Reflection on NZ Society - Scibooks

Jean Balchin Mar 20, 2018

When I was a child, I was rather prone to misbehaving. On occasions when I was particularly naughty, my father would sit me down with a copy of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and would order me to rewrite four of my favourite entries. It wasn’t actually that bad a punishment; being rather childish and petulant, … Read More

Large-scale genetic study provides new insight into the causes of stroke - News

Jean Balchin Mar 19, 2018

An large-scale international genetic study on stroke, based on DNA samples of 520,000 people has identified 22 new genetic risk factors for stroke. Published recently in the journal Nature Genetics, the study’s participants originated from Europe, North and South America, Asia, Africa and Australia, and were compiled from 29 large studies. 67,000 participants in the study had suffered a stroke. From … Read More

What are the challenges for First-Year Core Science Courses? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 28, 2018

Professor Karen Burke da Silva was the keynote speaker at Day 1 of the 2017 First-Year Science Educators’ Colloquium, held in Wellington. Her topic: Transforming large first year science classes: A comprehensive approach to student engagement. Currently at Flinders University, she’s been instrumental in setting up an ‘integrated teaching environment’ that’s seen a drop in withdrawals, and a marked … Read More

Who’s afraid of Noam Chomsky? - Mind Matters

Michael Corballis Feb 26, 2018

Me. But let’s press on regardless. Noam Chomsky is a polarising figure in modern intellectual life. Best known in popular discourse for his radical criticism of US foreign policy, he has written countless best-selling book on this and related political topics. It is as a philosopher and linguist, though, that he is likely to be best remembered intellectually, … Read More

Data should smash the biological myth of promiscuous males and sexually coy females - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 17, 2018

Zuleyma Tang-Martinez, University of Missouri-St. Louis. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. That males are naturally promiscuous while females are coy and choosy is a widely held belief. Even many scientists – including some biologists, psychologists and anthropologists – tout this notion when interviewed by the media … Read More

From testosterone to dogs, and physics for babies: five fascinating books in 2017 - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 20, 2017

George Aranda, Deakin University In my mild-mannered persona as an academic in science education, I teach and research ways that science can be better taught in Australia and globally. But every year I also explore the world of science books. I scope what’s new and interesting for my not-for-profit science book blog, and the Big Ideas … Read More

Fonterra’s blindspot – synthetic milk - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Oct 13, 2017

Last year I found myself sitting on a plane beside a Fonterra executive who was bound for Chicago, where the dairy giant’s US operation is based. I asked him what he considered to be the biggest issues the company faced. He immediately mentioned “trace-ability” and giving Fonterra’s customers confidence in the safety of its products, something that is rightly … Read More

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

Cyclostomes: marine survivors from the Jurassic - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 15, 2016

by Professor Abby Smith, Department of Marine Science, University of Otago Imagine if you found a creature that dropped a couple of fertilised eggs into a pouch and a week or two later gave birth to hundreds of babies.  Only a very few insects (and, oddly, armadillos) do this on land.  In the sea, only one kind of creature can … Read More

Ant-tastic science - Pointing At Science

Steve Pointing Mar 23, 2016

There have been several recent scientific papers about ants that really caught my eye. I share some thoughts on these below, or you can listen to my Dear Science podcast this week for more on these stories. War and Peace – ant style African acacia ants build their colonies in trees and are well known … Read More