Tagged: brain

The slippery grammar of spoken vs written English - Lippy Linguist

Andreea Calude Mar 16, 2018

Andreea S. Calude, University of Waikato This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. My grammar checker and I are on a break. Due to irreconcilable differences, we are no longer on speaking terms. It all started when it became dead set on putting commas before every single “which”. Despite all the … Read More

Brain imaging shows senior moments are selective - News

Jean Balchin Mar 08, 2018

When I was a child, I vividly remember a very funny episode with my Grandpa. He couldn’t find his glasses – yet there they were, perched on the top of his head. I thought he was just playing along, but I gradually realised that he was being serious. It still makes me chuckle to this day, although memory loss isn’t … Read More

New study reveals why some people are more creative than others - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 26, 2018

Roger Beaty, Harvard University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Creativity is often defined as the ability to come up with new and useful ideas. Like intelligence, it can be considered a trait that everyone – not just creative “geniuses” like Picasso and Steve Jobs – possesses in some capacity. Read More

Science Tank | Einstein - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 22, 2017

“When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute. But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute – and it’s longer than any hour. That’s relativity.” – Albert Einstein This guy kind of needs no introduction but, while most people know that he was a total genius, they don’t really … Read More

How does the hypothalamus control ageing? - Guest Work

Guest Author Jul 28, 2017

Richard Faragher, University of Brighton If you are reading this and you don’t smoke, then your major risk factor for dying is probably your age. That’s because we have nearly eliminated mortality in early life, thanks to advances in science and engineering. But despite this progress, we still haven’t worked out how to eliminate the damaging effects … Read More

The brain and the gut talk to each other - Guest Work

Guest Author Jul 17, 2017

Antonina Mikocka-Walus, Deakin University It’s widely recognised that emotions can directly affect stomach function. As early as 1915, influential physiologist Walter Cannon noted that stomach functions are changed in animals when frightened. The same is true for humans. Those who stress a lot often report diarrhoea or stomach pain. We now know this is because the … Read More

The mutant PRICKLE and the split brain - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Jan 31, 2017

We rarely hear of scientific work making positive use of otherwise unhappy situations, perhaps because writers feel they don’t “sell” well. We also don’t often hear about smaller projects. Here a couple’s unfortunate luck with their child is put to good use learning more about brain development. We all have a brain, in a very real sense … Read More

Psychobiotics – bacteria as a psychiatric medicine? - News

John Kerr Oct 31, 2016

A growing field of research – psychobiotics – hints that the millions of bacteria living inside us have more of a say in our mental well-being than we think. The term ‘psychobiotics’ was coined in 2013 by Ted Dinan to describe bacteria that “produce a health benefit in patients suffering from psychiatric illness.” Since then there have already been leaps forward in … Read More

Electric dreams of sheep - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Oct 05, 2016

At the moment there is more attention given to, and concern about, machines getting smarter than us. But there is also research going on which possibly, probably, definitely (depending on your source) will make us smarter, stronger, and/or creative. This short video interested me for two reasons.   Firstly, the suggestion that by tapping electronically into our dreams we could … Read More