Tagged: buildings

Reengineering elevators could transform 21st-century cities - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 09, 2017

By Antony Wood, Illinois Institute of Technology and Dario Trabucco, Università Iuav di Venezia In the 160 or so years since the first skyscrapers were built, technological innovations of many kinds have allowed us to build them to reach astonishing heights. Today there is a 1,000-meter (167-story) building under construction in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Even … Read More

First Light House Third in USA - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Oct 03, 2011

A few months back I wrote about the First Light House that was too have competed at the Solar Decathlon in Washington DC. The First Light House team in front of their house in Washington DC (Credit: Stefano Paltera/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) As a quick refresher, the US Department of Energy web site summarises the competition … Read More

First Light on Energy Efficient Bach - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Jun 10, 2011

A computer render of the First Light House, from the FirstLight web site Its not often that Wellington City Council allows a bach (crib to you southerners) to be built at Frank Kitts Park on Wellington’s waterfront. However, before Waterfront Watch get too alarmed, this construction was the live demonstration / test of the First Light house, developed and built … Read More

Christchurch Update…the demolition list - Digging the Dirt

Brigid Gallagher Apr 04, 2011

On Friday April 1, a list was released that announced the fate of 68 heritage buildings, amongst others.   Designated for demolition, partial demolition or to make safe, the names of recognisable buildings are visible.  Of the 68, 43 are to be demolished 9 are to be made safe 16 are to be partially demolished But what does this mean? … Read More

More Power, Less Acceleration - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Mar 16, 2011

Lyttleton's Time Ball Station from the Stuff web site Just a quick update today, following on from the theme of the last post, and the horror of the devastation Japan is now experiencing. With the NZ government announcing a Royal Commission of Enquiry into the building collapses in Christchurch, it has been interesting to observe people’s perceptions, from politicians all … Read More

How Building Standards Have Changed - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Oct 04, 2010

With the recent events in Canterbury and Invercargill it looks like the building standards in NZ will again come under close scrutiny. The suitability of our standards is a valid question and response, especially when our knowledge has recently been increased by the Earthquake and the collapse of the Invercargill sports stadium roof. The first design standards for earthquake loadings … Read More

Initial Thoughts on the Canterbury Earthquake - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Sep 06, 2010

Deans Homestead - Photo from stuff.co.nz The big earthquake in Canterbury last weekend has certainly reminded us just how shaky our isles are, in dramatic fashion. While our thoughts are with all of those affected, and we are all grateful that there has been no loss of life, the quake has exposed — very graphically — just how buildings react … Read More

Building Materials That Kill Bacteria - The Science of Architecture

Ken Collins Aug 23, 2010

In an effort to control the spread of bacteria (that are harmful to humans), the science world is always coming up with some interesting innovations. This now includes additives to building materials that will kill bacteria, including the dreaded MRSA strain. Antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal powdercoating has been available commercially for a few years, and now scientists have developed an … Read More

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