Tagged: Climate

When an ancient volcanic ‘supereruption’ caused sudden cooling, early humans got lucky - Hot off the press

Guest Author Jul 22, 2021

Ben Black, Rutgers University and Anja Schmidt, University of Cambridge Around 74,000 years ago, a “supereruption” on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, blasted out an estimated 5,000 cubic kilometres of magma. This was the Toba eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the past 2 million years. To put 5,000 cubic kilometres of magma in perspective, this is more than … Read More

Climate explained: when Antarctica melts, will gravity changes lift up land and lower sea levels? - Climate: Explained

Robert McLachlan May 04, 2021

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz I’ve heard the gravity changes when Antarctica melts will lower the seas around New Zealand. Will that save … Read More

Climate scientists: concept of net zero is a dangerous trap - The Changing Climate

Guest Author Apr 24, 2021

James Dyke, University of Exeter; Robert Watson, University of East Anglia, and Wolfgang Knorr, Lund University Sometimes realisation comes in a blinding flash. Blurred outlines snap into shape and suddenly it all makes sense. Underneath such revelations is typically a much slower-dawning process. Doubts at the back of the mind grow. The sense of confusion that things cannot be made … Read More

Climate explained: what was the Medieval warm period? - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Apr 22, 2021

  Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz What was the Medieval warm period? What caused it, and did carbon dioxide play a role? … Read More

The secret life of puddles: their value to nature is subtle, but hugely important - The Changing Climate

Guest Author Mar 30, 2021

Gregory Moore, The University of Melbourne It’s official: Australians endured the coldest, wettest summer in at least five years thanks to La Niña, a climate phenomenon over the Pacific Ocean. Before we knew it, autumn rolled in bringing more rain. Tragically, it led to widespread flooding across New South Wales, but elsewhere it helped to create more puddles. Read More

How particles ejected from the Sun affect Earth’s climate - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Mar 24, 2021

  Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz When the Sun ejects solar particles into space, how does this affect the Earth and … Read More

The El Niño/Southern oscillation and the rise and fall of the Incan Empire - Tuhia ki te rangi

Guest Author Dec 21, 2020

Alex Matheson What do sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean have to do with the rise and fall of one of the greatest pre-modern civilisations? Read on – you might be surprised! The Incan Empire The Incan Empire was, at the height of its power, the largest in North or South America. By the time of the Spanish conquest … Read More

What would happen if we cut down the Amazon rainforest? - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Nov 18, 2020

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz What would happen if we cut down the entire Amazon rainforest? Could it be replaced by an equal … Read More

The sun is setting on unsustainable long-haul, short-stay tourism — regional travel bubbles are the future - COVID-19

Guest Author Jul 03, 2020

James Higham, University of Otago Unprecedented border closures and the domestic lockdown have paralysed New Zealand’s $40.9 billion a year tourism industry. In the process, the vulnerability of the sector to external shocks and the tenuous nature of tourism employment have been exposed. While New Zealand’s handling of the pandemic has been hailed as a global masterclass, and the … Read More

Coastal seas around New Zealand are heading into a marine heatwave, again - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 23, 2019

Craig Stevens, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and Ben Noll, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research As New Zealanders are enjoying their days at the beach, unusually warm ocean temperatures look to be a harbinger of another marine heatwave. Despite the exceptional conditions during last year’s heatwave in the Tasman Sea, this … Read More