Tagged: cognition

Paul Connett’s misrepresentation of maternal F exposure study debunked - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Mar 06, 2018

Anti-fluoride campaigners are misrepresenting a recent Mexican study claiming its findings should cause governments around the world to abandon community water fluoridation (CWF). Their claims are unwarranted because the study has a high degree of uncertainty. Activists are misrepresenting the accuracy of the studies findings. Because Mexico has areas of endemic fluorosis the study itself is not relevant to CWF. Read More

‘Anumeric’ people: What happens when a language has no words for numbers? - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 06, 2018

Caleb Everett, University of Miami This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Numbers do not exist in all cultures. There are numberless hunter-gatherers embedded deep in Amazonia, living along branches of the world’s largest river tree. Instead of using words for precise quantities, these people rely exclusively on terms analogous … Read More

Babies can learn the value of persistence by watching grownups stick with a challenge - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 17, 2018

Julia Leonard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. You’re at home trying to make fresh tomato sauce, but can’t seem to get the tomatoes out of their plastic container from the grocery store. The bottom latch is not opening, so you pull harder. Although you’ve never … Read More

‘Brain training’ apps won’t make you smarter - Guest Work

John Kerr Dec 01, 2017

If you think that a few bucks spent on a braining training app is a solid investment in your intellectual future, think again. Anyone who has spent a reasonable amount of time on the internet has probably heard of the brain training app Lumosity. The San Francisco-based company has spent millions on advertising and claims to have 85 million users. Their app is … Read More

Note to self – eat more chocolate - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Oct 17, 2012

Apparently the pinnacle of one’s scientific career is to win a Nobel Prize.  Having not won a Nobel yet I will just need to accept by faith that it would indeed be the pinnacle of my career.  Thanks to a brilliant article in the New England Journal of Medicine this week I now have a … Continue reading » … Read More

Crows join humans in the ability to infer hidden causal agents - misc.ience

Aimee Whitcroft Sep 20, 2012

New Caledonian crows – smarter every time we look at them. A fascinating new piece of research was published a couple of days ago in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (or PNAS for short). It shows that New Caledonian crows are capable of a cognitive feat previously only thought to be [...] … Read More