Tagged: conservation

Taxonomy for Sale to the Highest Bidder - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 15, 2019

Shaena Montanari Last December, the environmental group Rainforest Trust celebrated its 30th anniversary by auctioning off the rights to name 12 newly discovered species, including orchids, frogs, and an ant. The Virginia-based nonprofit group claimed the auction raised $182,500 for its conservation programs. The most valuable animal turned out to be a wormlike amphibian from Panama, which … Read More

Island focus to reduce extinction - News

Guest Author Apr 04, 2019

Erin Maessen Focusing conservation efforts on 169 islands, including five in New Zealand, could help to combat the global extinction crisis. This is according to the findings of a collaborative study between forty institutions, including universities and conservation organisations, published in PLOS ONE last week. The researchers combined conservation benefit with feasibility to assess 1,279 islands worldwide, whittling … Read More

Thoughts on a question about kākāpō - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Mar 21, 2019

My interest in kākāpō began way back in my honours year at uni: a guest speaker told us that as far as anybody knew, the last remaining birds were a few males, somewhere in Fiordland. I remember feeling that that sounded really sad – those lonely males booming for females who never came. Shortly after that, a relatively healthy population … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Concluding thoughts - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 24, 2018

I wanted to end now on a couple of final reflections and thoughts. First, I implore you as the next generation of ecologists to think critically about the assumptions of your disciplines. Don’t just blindly swallow the positions of your older colleagues, including me (OK, not so much me…). Restoration Ecology, in particular, was developed and propagated mostly by … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 10 – Winners never quit - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 23, 2018

Some final comments from my interview with Kim Hill:  ‘It’s a very defeatist way of looking at things, and I don’t buy it!’ ‘Please make him stop! He’s such a defeatist!’ ‘So, the answer is don’t care? Do whatever?!’  A lot of people who advocate for novel ecosystems and new approaches in ecology and our understandings of nature … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 7 – We’re going to end up with a monoculture - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 20, 2018

Here are more comments from my interview with Kim Hill: ‘…we do not have to accept a future that sees our ecosystems as homogeneous with everything else, comprised of international tramp species and the few natives that can persist with them’ ‘…there’s a tonne of [introduced] plants out there that if we let go they’ll change landscapes and there’ll be … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 3 – It’s a war! - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 16, 2018

We often frame our relationship with introduced species in New Zealand this way – as a war, a fight, a battle. And there are plenty of examples of it, most recently in the Department of Conservation’s ‘War on Weeds’ or its ‘Battle for our Birds’. War metaphors feature prominently in both popular and scientific literatures in New … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 2 – Natives define us - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 15, 2018

‘It’s hard to swallow giving up ur Godzone…’  (Feedback on Kim Hill interview). We have this idea in NZ that our national identity, at least when it comes to wildlife, is defined almost solely by our native species. Sure, we accept cows and kiwifruit and so on when in farmed or horticultural settings, but with the notable exception of … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 1 – They don’t belong here! - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 14, 2018

OK, Number 1 – the first belief for us to look at: that they don’t belong here. With ‘they’ of course being introduced species. Here are a couple of quotes from the feedback to my Kim Hill interview to lead us into this one. ‘We should round up all possums that have eaten more than a certain amount of … Read More