Tagged: conservation

NZ researchers line up worst island invaders - News

John Kerr Jun 14, 2017

New Zealand conservation researchers have assembled a rogues’ gallery of the worst invasive species for islands around the world. In a new article in Environmental Conservation, published this week, Dr James Russel from the University of Auckland and colleagues review the challenges of holding invaders at bay on small island states. Invasive species can have a detrimental impact on … Read More

For the birds – reflections on the PCE report - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Jun 08, 2017

There’s an important recommendation missing from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s list of things to help endangered birds. It hardly would work for all birds, but it is ridiculous that it is banned for those birds for which it would work. Let people farm them. Roger Beattie has demonstrated that he can successfully raise weka. There would be … Read More

New homes for our native birds? - Guest Work

Guest Work May 31, 2017

By Prof Phil Seddon, University of Otago. The newly released report from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (Taonga of an island nation) highlights the precarious state of our native avifauna, with one in five of our 168 native bird species at risk of extinction. Birds are highly visible but also highly vulnerable indicators of habitat change, not just … Read More

Widespread invasive species control is a risky business - Guest Work

Guest Work May 26, 2017

By R. Keller Kopf, Charles Sturt University; Dale Nimmo, Charles Sturt University, and Paul Humphries, Charles Sturt University In 1977, on the islands of French Polynesia, government authorities released a predatory snail. They hoped this introduction would effectively control another species of invasive snail, previously introduced to supply escargot. Instead, by the early … Read More

Not a lizard nor a dinosaur, tuatara is the sole survivor of a once-widespread reptile group - Guest Work

Guest Work May 12, 2017

By Marc Emyr Huw Jones, University of Adelaide Have you ever heard of the tuatara? It’s a reptile that decapitates birds with its saw-like jaws, lives to about 100 years old, and can remain active in near-freezing temperatures. It’s also the sole survivor of a lineage as old as the first dinosaurs. May 2017 marks 150 … Read More

Conservation genetics of de-extinction: a primer - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

Could we really bring an extinct species back from the dead, and, if we did – what happens next? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Tammy Steeves from the University of Canterbury examines the genetic … Read More

De-extinction: the devil is in the details - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

If we could resurrect an extinct species, should we? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special feature issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the issue. In this guest post, special issue editor Prof Phil Seddon from the University of Otago delves into the realities of bringing a species back from extinction.  Conservationists … Read More

The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide - Guest Work

Guest Work May 02, 2017

By Tim Doherty, Deakin University; Aaron J. Wirsing, University of Washington; Chris Dickman, University of Sydney; Dale Nimmo, Charles Sturt University; Euan Ritchie, Deakin University, and Thomas Newsome, Deakin University Humans and their canine companions share many close bonds. Wolves (Canis lupus) were the first animal domesticated by … Read More

The search for Nessie showcases an exciting new conservation tool - Wild Science

Helen Taylor Apr 13, 2017

I was sceptical about my lab head joining the hunt for the Loch Ness monster, until I realised it was an excellent way to promote the amazing possibilities of environmental DNA. Making a splash Last week’s news was full of tales of how my boss, Professor Neil Gemmell, was going to take on the challenge of tracking down … Read More

De-extinction: more hype than hope - Wild Science

Helen Taylor Mar 08, 2017

Efforts to resurrect extinct species could divert funding away from conserving extant species, but a more basic issue with “de-extinction” is the misinformation surrounding the topic. A recent study by New Zealand and Australian researchers puts a price on “de-extinction”. The team also estimate how many native extant species might be lost by directing these funds away from existing … Read More