Tagged: conservation

Ivory up in flames, but who really noticed? How messages on elephant poaching might be missed - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 13, 2018

Matthew H. Holden, The University of Queensland; Alexander Richard Braczkowski, The University of Queensland; Christopher O’Bryan, The University of Queensland; Duan Biggs, Griffith University; Hugh Possingham, The University of Queensland; James Allan, The University of Queensland, and James Watson, The University of Queensland This article was … Read More

Cool! Antarctic krill can turn microplastics into nanoplastics - News

Jean Balchin Mar 09, 2018

A groundbreaking Griffith University study has found Antarctic krill which ingest microplastics are able to turn them into nanoplastics through digestion. What are Krill? Krill is a general term used to refer to around 85 species of free-swimming crustaceans called euphausiids, of which Antarctic krill is one species. Antarctic krill are one of the most abundant and successful animal species on … Read More

Reply to the Threatened Species Ambassador - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Feb 21, 2018

In a recent article in The Spinoff, the Department of Conservation’s Threatened Species Ambassador Nicola Toki makes three arguments. First, that native species and introduced predators in New Zealand cannot co-exist. Second, that conservation should be undertaken not only in sanctuaries, but also on private land. And third, that it is the indigenous subset of our biodiversity that fundamentally … Read More

Poor little Pangolins – Driven headlong to extinction by human greed and stupidity - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 20, 2018

Pangolins are strange little creatures, with their diet of ants and termites, and the entire outer surface of their bodies covered with armour-like scales (face, belly and the inner surfaces of the limbs are either hairy or naked). When in danger, pangolins are able to roll up in a ball, presenting only that armoured surface to a predator. Actually, … Read More

Common products, like perfume, paint and printer ink, are polluting the atmosphere - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 19, 2018

Jenny Fisher, University of Wollongong and Kathryn Emmerson, CSIRO This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Picture the causes of air pollution in a major city and you are likely to visualise pollutants spewing out of cars, trucks and buses. For some types of air pollutants, however, transportation is … Read More

As Arctic sea ice shrinks, new research shows how much energy polar bears use to find food - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 07, 2018

Anthony Pagano, University of California, Santa Cruz This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Polar bears live in a remote and inhospitable environment far from most human settlements. For most biologists, opportunities to observe these animals are fleeting. In fact, scientists’ main resources for understanding basic behaviors of polar bears on … Read More

Microplastics causing big problems for iconic ocean giants - News

Jean Balchin Feb 06, 2018

According to a new analysis for the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, microplastics in our oceans are posing a significant risk to filter-feeding marine animals like manta rays and whale sharks. Microplastics are small plastic pieces less than five millimetres long . If you’ve ever bought a shower scrub, or exfoliator, you’ve probably heard of microbeads too. Microbeads are a type of … Read More

Predator Free 2050 – more like a religious war than science-based conservation policy - Politecol

- Wayne Linklater Jan 29, 2018

One of the leaders of the Predator-Free movement, Sir Rob Fenwick (Chair of the Predator Free New Zealand Trust and a Director of Predator-Free 2050), described Predator-Free 2050 as a “project born in a leap of faith” (Dominion Post). He appears to think the predator-free goal is more like a religion than a science-based conservation project. And, his religion is … Read More

Book review: Zoo Ethics - Scibooks

Guest Author Dec 22, 2017

Reviewed by Susan Rapley Modern zoos exist at a difficult intersection: whether their containment and treatment of animals is morally and ethically justified, juxtaposed against an increasing need within the wider world for their research and conservation efforts. In Zoo Ethics: The Challenges of Compassionate Conservation, Jenny Gray seeks to investigate these conflicting concerns, a task she is well … Read More

Will the real frog please stand up… - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Dec 05, 2017

Luke Easton, a PhD student from our laboratory studying Conservation Palaeontology, is about to drop into Martinborough’s Cave of Bones. Abseiling into the tomo he is assaulted by the putrid rich smell and sight of rotting sheep carcases that lie between him and his treasure. You see, Luke is on the hunt for the bones of some of the … Read More