Tagged: CSIRO

Sludge, snags, and surreal animals: life aboard a voyage to study the abyss - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 26, 2017

By Tim O’Hara, Museum Victoria Over the past five weeks I led a “voyage of discovery”. That sounds rather pretentious in the 21st century, but it’s still true. My team, aboard the CSIRO managed research vessel, the Investigator, has mapped and sampled an area of the planet that has never been surveyed before. The RV … Read More

Book review: Big, bold and blue – Lessons from Australia’s Marine Protected Areas - Scibooks

SciBooks Oct 04, 2016

By Raewyn Peart As of 2015, Australia has designated over a third of its waters as marine protected areas, leaving much to be learnt from their experience – as is covered in a new book on the topic. This impressive book, edited by James Fitzsimons and Geoff Westcott, provides a comprehensive description of progress with establishing networks of marine … Read More

Southern hemisphere joins north in breaching carbon dioxide milestone - Guest Work

Guest Work May 17, 2016

By Paul Krummel, CSIRO and Paul Fraser, CSIRO As we predicted two months ago, the background atmospheric carbon dioxide levels measured at Cape Grim on Tasmania’s northwest coast have officially passed the 400 parts per million (ppm) mark. Our measurements, compiled by our team at CSIRO together with the Bureau of Meteorology, show that the … Read More

CSIRO cuts: climate science really does need to shift its focus towards adaptation - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 15, 2016

Peter Tangney, Flinders University Climate scientists have recently been outraged by job losses within CSIRO. Sixty climate jobs are likely to be lost. Chief executive Larry Marshall has said the reaction to the cuts from scientists has been “more like religion that science”. Well, in certain respects, he has a point. In reaction to the cuts, … Read More

CSIRO cuts to climate science are against the public good - Unsorted

Guest Work Feb 04, 2016

Roger Jones, Victoria University CSIRO (the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) is facing another round of job losses to basic public research, with the news that the organisation is making deep staffing cuts to areas such as Oceans and Atmosphere and Land and Water. Internally, there are signals that Oceans and Atmosphere will be … Read More

Plastic oceans, plastic diets: The unsavoury reality for seabirds - News

Erica Mather Sep 02, 2015

A new study predicts that 99 per cent of the world’s seabirds will consume plastic by 2050.  Seabirds easily mistake brightly coloured plastics for food or accidentally swallow pieces such as bottle caps, bags and fibres from synthetic clothing that have washed out to sea from waste deposits, sewers and rivers. Scientists from CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial … Read More

Researchers worldwide team up to tackle the plight of honeybees - News

Erica Mather Aug 25, 2015

Although many of us first think of honeybees as wondrous honey-makers, their most essential role is the pollination of crops. Sadly, honeybees worldwide are under serious threat. International researchers are employing the technology of micro-sensors to find out exactly why. As a result of their evolutionary success and their significance in human food production, the European honeybee (Apis mellifera) is … Read More

New Aussie state of the climate snapshot: NZ needs one too - Hot Topic

Gareth Renowden Mar 17, 2010

Australia’s CSIRO and Bureau of Meteorology have released a State of the Climate report [PDF], a succinct six page effort designed to provide the Aussie public with an overview of how their climate has been changing, and how it is expected to change in the future. Headlines (from the media release): Highly variable rainfall across the [...] … Read More

When science and politics collide – the fallout from the Nutt affair - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Nov 03, 2009

The vast majority of scientists in this country undertake research that is funded by the tax payer and as such, they are often required to prepare reports and give advice to government departments and ministers. Professor David Nutt The pursuit of evidence-based policy in government is essential and something that should be encouraged. But what happens when the views of … Read More