Tagged: Data

Anti-fluoridation campaigners often use statistical significance to confirm bias - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Dec 06, 2017

Frankly, these days I just get turned off by media reports of studies showing statistically significant relationships as evidence for or against the latest health or other fads. I was pleased to read this Nature article – Five ways to fix statistics – recently as it mirrors my concern at the way statistical analysis is sometimes used to justify or confirm a bias and not … Read More

OIA Accessibility - Honest Universe

Mark Hanna Nov 20, 2017

The Official Information Act has an accessibility problem. I wrote recently about asking the government for information, having just published a guide to using the OIA. The OIA is a powerful tool, but it can be limited by how government agencies choose to follow it. One particular limitation that comes up, again and again, … Read More

Asking the government for information - Honest Universe

Mark Hanna Oct 31, 2017

You have the right to ask the government for information. Because of a law called the Official Information Act (OIA), they’re obliged to give it to you unless there is a good reason not to. You’ve likely seen the OIA mentioned in the news. Phrases like “Documents released to [news outlet] under the Official Information Act” can often be found … Read More

Flaw and porkie in anti-fluoride report claiming a flaw in Canadian study - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Oct 19, 2017

 Anti-fluoride campaigners have launched another attack on a Canadian fluoridation cessation study. They claim it is flawed – but there is a huge flaw in their own critique. Anti-fluoride group, Fluoride Action Network, ironically stamps their own critique of the Calgary fluoridation cessation study as “debunked.” I discussed their original attack in February last year (see Anti-fluoridationist’s flawed attacks on … Read More

Super cute home robots are coming, but think twice before you trust them - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 09, 2017

By Cherie Lacey, Victoria University of Wellington and Catherine Caudwell, Victoria University of Wellington (pictured) Following several delays, a new range of social domestic robots is expected to enter the market at the end of this year. They are no ordinary bots. Designed to provide companionship and care, they recognise faces and voices of close family and … Read More

What happens to our health records when we die? - News

Jean Balchin Jul 21, 2017

Leaps and strides in digital data acquisition and storage has lead to the phenomenon of electronic mortality, where digital data — from medical records to genomic information — can exist, and be accessed, for a potentially infinite period. Consequently, there are major ramifications in a variety of different areas. In particular, health research relies of large data sets. All over the … Read More

MBIE’s slick new collection of data - The Dismal Science

Donal Curtin Jul 04, 2017

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has released the Labour Market Dashboard – a one-stop self-service tool which displays labour market information from many different sources in one place. According to Manager of Labour Market Trends Nita Zodgekar, one of MBIE’s roles is to advise on New Zealand’s labour market and develop policy solutions to grow … Read More

Open data, transparency and power – role of the Virtual Health Information Network - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Jun 14, 2017

Dr Andrea Teng, Dr Barry Milne, Mr Philip Walker, Prof Tony Blakely The NZ Government is showing strong leadership on data sharing. In this blog we describe some of the opportunities and the challenges in this new data environment. We focus on how the Virtual Health Information Network (VHIN) can contribute to stronger health research and therefore benefit the health … Read More

What (e/im)migration data to use when - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 02, 2017

I was having a conversation with someone the other day, trying to explain both what data there were on movements of people into (and out of) New Zealand, and which data was useful for what purpose.  Reflecting on that afterwards, it seemed that a post might be useful.  This follows on from my post last week on the Herald’s misleading … Read More

Hypothesis testing: open data edition - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Apr 18, 2017

Credit: Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal. The graph looked plausible. It didn’t really fit my experience, but it didn’t seem implausible either. So I took a 5 minute jaunt over to Berkeley’s SDA engine, which draws on US GSS data. First I ran a basic regression of happiness on age, age squared, with a high score in wordsum (a vocabulary … Read More