Tagged: DNA

DNA facial prediction could make protecting your privacy more difficult - Guest Work

Guest Author May 03, 2018

Caitlin Curtis, The University of Queensland and James Hereward, The University of Queensland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Technologies for amplifying, sequencing and matching DNA have created new opportunities in genomic science. In this series When DNA Talks we look at the ethical and social implications. Everywhere … Read More

Is your genome really your own? The public and forensic value of DNA - News

Guest Author May 02, 2018

Nathan Scudder, University of Canberra and Dennis McNevin, University of Technology Sydney This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Technologies for amplifying, sequencing and matching DNA have created new opportunities in genomic science. In this series When DNA Talks we look at the ethical and social implications. When Joseph … Read More

UNICEF and friends VS the outspoken Anti-vaxxers - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Mar 07, 2018

Back in mid-February, UNICEF NZ posted a piece on the importance of vaccines. Shortly thereafter, the comments thread had been overrun by anti-vaccination pro-disease activists. (I have to say, I’m really impressed with the person who does UNICEF’s social media. Talk about grace and dignity under fire!) This seems to happen every time a story about vaccine-preventable disease hits the … Read More

Deciphering the genetic landscape of Ireland - News

Jean Balchin Feb 07, 2018

FineSTRUCTURE analysis demonstrates that haplotypes mirror geography across the British Isles as illustrated in A.) FineSTRUCTURE clustering dendrogram B.) Principle Component space. Administrative boundaries in map sourced from GADM (https://gadm.org). A recent study in PLOS Genetics has revealed a previously hidden genetic landscape of Ireland, shaped through geography and historical migrations. The genome-wide study, led by Ross Byrne and … Read More

How palaeolithic humans shaped the modern genome - News

Jean Balchin Jan 31, 2018

When we think about our ancestry, we think about our grandmothers and grandfathers – and, if we have photo albums nearby, or a family member interested in genealogy, we might know a bit more about our great-grandmothers, great-grandfathers, and so on. I remember traveling around Scotland a few years ago, and chancing upon a small churchyard. Every second gravestone, most … Read More

Axolotl and flatworm genetic codes help solve regeneration riddle - News

Jean Balchin Jan 26, 2018

When I was fourteen years old, I arrived home from school one day to find a large glass tank on my bedside table. Inside this tank was a curious creature, pale pink in colour, just floating there and eyeballing me through the glass. I instantly felt rather uncomfortable. What was this strange animal? Was it an alien? Why was … Read More

The Curious Case of Stem Cells - News

Guest Author Dec 19, 2017

Much like Benjamin Button, mature cells may soon be able to revert to a state earlier in their development – one where they can become any cell type. New research in Australia,published by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, has moved us one step forward in the effort to produce these induced pluripotent stem cells … Read More

Traditional Chinese medicine: Eye of newt and toe of frog - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Dec 09, 2017

‘Double, double toil and trouble; fire burn, and cauldron bubble’ chant the three witches in the cavern, lightening flashing outside, in Act 4, Scene 1 of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. It’s images like these, conjured up by the great bard himself, that I associate with traditional Chinese medicines and herbal remedies. The implied promise that if I take this concoction, my health … Read More

DNA shows tiny tardigrades are just as cool as we thought - News

Jean Balchin Jul 28, 2017

New genome sequences have revealed exciting new information about the origins of tardigrades as well as the genes that underlie their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions.  A team of researchers led by Mark Blaxter and Kazuharu Arakawa from the universities of Edinburgh, Scotland and Keio, Japan respectively, have carefully stitched together the DNA code for two … Read More

Five things you should know about taxonomy - Guest Work

Guest Author Jul 10, 2017

Kevin Thiele, University of Western Australia; David Yeates, CSIRO; Kym Abrams, University of Western Australia, and Nerida Wilson, Western Australian Museum Earlier this year, a Canadian scientist named a new moth species Neopalpa donaldtrumpi (read that name out loud for full effect). It’s an insect with a golden hairdo and relatively … Read More