Tagged: earthquakes

The earthquake that rattled Melbourne was among Australia’s biggest in half a century, but rock records reveal far mightier ones - News

Guest Author Sep 23, 2021

Mark Quigley, The University of Melbourne and Januka Attanayake, The University of Melbourne   An earthquake that struck near Melbourne today is one of the largest in Australia since instrumental seismic records began. However, the geological record of ground-breaking fault ruptures tells us much larger earthquakes have occurred across the continent. Some of these earthquakes would have been witnessed … Read More

NZ’s next large Alpine Fault quake is likely coming sooner than we thought, study shows - Hot off the press

Guest Author Apr 20, 2021

Jamie Howarth, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington and Rupert Sutherland, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington The Alpine Fault marks the boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates in the South Island of New Zealand. Author provided The chances of New Zealand’s Alpine Fault rupturing in a damaging earthquake in the next 50 years are … Read More

A bump in the night - Lately, In Science

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Sep 04, 2020

On the third of September, 2010, I – like many Cantabrians – went to sleep safe in the assumption that Christchurch ‘didn’t have earthquakes’. It was something I took quiet reassurance in: growing up in the Wellington region, where earthquake drills and talk of ‘the Big One’ were omnipresent, it was something of a novelty to live somewhere with “no … Read More

New Zealand sits on top of the remains of a giant ancient volcanic plume - Guest Work

Guest Author May 28, 2020

Simon Lamb, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington and Timothy Stern, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington Back in the 1970s, scientists came up with a revolutionary idea about how Earth’s deep interior works. They proposed it is slowly churning like a lava lamp, with buoyant blobs rising as plumes of hot mantle rock from near … Read More

Murchison and geology - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Jun 19, 2019

[avatar user=”duncansteel” size=”thumbnail” align=”right” /] There are many places, both in New Zealand and elsewhere around the globe, that are named for the nineteenth-century Scottish geologist Sir Roderick Impey Murchison. It seems astonishing how many of these are connected in some way with events of geological significance, or are otherwise of scientific importance.  One of my predilections is writing blog … Read More

Remembering the Christchurch earthquake eight years on - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 22, 2019

Today is the eighth anniversary of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake. Ken Gledhill was the Director of GeoNet at the time and shares some memories from the time and reflects on how GeoNet has been shaped by the quake. Eight years ago on 22nd February, Christchurch was struck by a M6.2 earthquake that caused widespread destruction and tragically claimed the lives … Read More

After the quakes – hard lessons that help us all do better - Scibooks

Peter Griffin Dec 08, 2017

I was at the science communicator’s conference in Auckland on the afternoon of 22 February, 2011, when the massive earthquake struck Christchurch. The theme of the conference was “Listening to the other side” and we’d enjoyed several stimulating discussions during the day as non-scientists gave their views on ways to effectively communicate the science of complex issues. That abstract … Read More

New Zealand’s Alpine Fault reveals extreme underground heat and fluid pressure - Guest Work

Guest Author May 18, 2017

By Rupert Sutherland, Victoria University of Wellington An international team that drilled almost a kilometre deep into New Zealand’s Alpine Fault, which is expected to rupture in a major earthquake in the next decades, has found extremely hot temperatures and high fluid pressures. Our findings, published today in Nature, describe these surprising underground conditions. They have broad … Read More

New Zealand quake study reveals ruptures can be much bigger than we thought possible - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 27, 2017

By Stephen Hicks, University of Southampton No one could have expected what was to hit New Zealand in 2016. The country is certainly no stranger to being shaken up by moving tectonic plates. Yet on November 14 2016, it was struck by what may be the most complex rupture ever recorded, overshadowing even the highly destructive sequence of … Read More