Tagged: education

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

Why looking for aliens is good for society (even if there aren’t any) - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 27, 2017

Ian Crawford, UCL The search for life elsewhere in the universe is one of the most compelling aspects of modern science. Given its scientific importance, significant resources are devoted to this young science of astrobiology, ranging from rovers on Mars to telescopic observations of planets orbiting other stars. The holy grail of all this activity would be … Read More

A question for the Minister of Education - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Jun 30, 2017

I usually don’t pay much attention to the output of the Ministry of Education or its ministers.  I often fear that if I did it would turn out to be about disconcerting as MBIE’s output.   I focus on getting my own kids through the school system with as little enduring damage as possible  (one of the real joys of … Read More

Improving gender balance in physics - Physics Stop

Marcus Wilson Apr 07, 2017

The Institute of Physics has just released a report on recent interventions designed to improve the uptake of physics at ‘A’-level by girls*. Although there have been considerable efforts in the UK to improve the gender balance over two decades, there has not been any substantial change – about 20% of a typical A-level physics class is … Read More

How your daughter’s future doors may already be closed by the time she is six - Nano Girl

Michelle Dickinson Mar 17, 2017

Imagine you are reading a story to a child; the story goes something like this:   “There is one person at work who is really, really smart. They can figure out how to do things quickly, they come up with answers much faster and better than anyone else.  Now imagine telling this story: “There is one person at work who is … Read More

Is it OK for medical students to practise on themselves? - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 25, 2016

By Eleanor Milligan, Griffith University and Liz Fitzmaurice, Griffith University Medical students are practising invasive clinical procedures on themselves and fellow students at home as well as at medical school, a recent New Zealand study has confirmed. These procedures commonly include inserting a cannula, taking blood, and giving injections. Less commonly, students are suturing, … Read More

How we relate – What is meaningful engagement? - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf Oct 13, 2016

In a post-normal science world how we engage is fundamentally important. Next Tuesday Twitter users will have the opportunity to discuss meaningful engagement in a combined #scicommnz #scichatnz chat. SciCommNZ chats, using the hashtag #scicommnz, are where a community of scientists, science communicators and science educators meet on Twitter once a month. The chat aim is to … Read More

Education – private and public benefits - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Oct 11, 2016

Massey University’s Professor Giselle Byrnes, Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic and Enterprise), writes on the public benefits of tertiary education in this past week’s NBR. She makes a good case for the existence of public benefits; the main thrust of the piece is that the Productivity Commission’s report on tertiary pays insufficient heed to the public benefits while focusing on … Read More

COOLs? Are they as cool as they sound? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Sep 04, 2016

The National government is proposing a number of amendments to the NZ Education Act. One, which has already received quite a lot of press, sounds rather like a return to bulk funding under another name. But the latest one to hit the news is more like an untried social experiment with the potential for a lot of brown stuff to … Read More

Tertiary crystal balls - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Aug 06, 2016

Two weekends ago, I contributed to a panel session run at the Tertiary Education Union’s conference. My notes are copied below, cross-posted from The Sandpit. Interestingly, a few days later, Labour proposed something that sounds close to what I here suggested; I hope that they’re planning on using the available data appropriately. Notes for address to the … Read More