Tagged: Employment

Tipping in New Zealand - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton May 25, 2017

New Zealand has an excellent non-tipping equilibrium, but there’s been some discussion of encouraging a shift to tipping. A lot of restaurants do kinda have it, mostly (I think) as a way of securing rents from foreign tourists who don’t know better. But most of the discussion around tipping has the base economics of the thing wrong. The main point … Read More

‘Smart robots’ and the law - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 22, 2017

By Associate Professor Colin Gavaghan, Director of the New Zealand Law Foundation Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies, University of Otago The European Parliament’s Draft Report on Robotics has certainly captured the public imagination, and it’s easy to see why. Proposals about ‘smart robots,’ ‘robot killswitches’ and ‘electronic persons’ perfectly capture the zeitgeist, where talk of … Read More

How computer automation affects occupations: technology, jobs, and skills - The Dismal Science

Paul Walker Sep 22, 2016

A common argument you see with regard to computers and employment is that computer automation leads to major job losses. James Bessen deals with this issue in a new column at VoxEU.org. A modern version of the Luddite story. Bessen argues that this line of argument, however, ignores the dynamic economic responses that involve both changing … Read More

Future work - Ariadne

Robert Hickson May 16, 2016

There are four narratives about how increasing automation of manual and cognitive tasks will affect employment: Many people will no longer have paid employment, and will depend on government assistance. Many people will no longer have paid employment, but automation will create highly productive and equitable economies that enable people to pursue their own creative and social endeavours. As in … Read More

Five years on – perspectives on the Christchurch economy - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Feb 22, 2016

This week saw the  fifth anniversary of the most destructive of the thousands of earthquakes that have hit Christchurch and its neighbouring areas since September 2010. Christchurch is “home” to me. I haven’t lived there for decades, and don’t suppose I will again. But almost all my wider family live there, and my ancestors for 150 years or more have lived in … Read More

Uber Uber - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Dec 16, 2015

Well, the Ministry of Transport proposals around Uber could have been worse. This week’s white paper produced two preferred options. The first would place requirements on drivers; the second, on transport operators. The National Business Review asked me for comment on the proposals; here’s what I told them. “The government’s approach to taxicab regulation intends to avoid risks where … Read More

Refugees and the economy - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Sep 10, 2015

Richard Meadows at the Press asked me whether I’d seen any reports on the costs and benefits of accepting more refugees. I’ve not seen any real cost-benefit assessments, though I have seen indications that, in US data, huge numbers of refugees had zero effect on local labour markets – David Card’s work on the Marial boatlift. I’ve copied below what … Read More

Australia’s future workforce? - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Jun 29, 2015

Australia’s Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) has released a door-stopper of a report called Australia’s future workforce? It explores a range of themes and issues associated with changing workforces, with chapters from academics (largely), industry representatives, and policy people. CEDA is a respected non-profit organisation for economic and social issues; the equivalent of the Conference Board … Read More

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