Tagged: ethnicity

Unemployment doesn’t strike evenly… - The Dismal Science

Donal Curtin May 04, 2018

Yesterday’s labour force data for the March quarter came out much as expected: forecasters had been expecting a 0.6% increase in employment, and they got it, and they also got their predicted 4.4% unemployment rate, down from 4.5% in the December ’17 quarter. Even if there were no immediate dramas in the data, it’s still worth picking out one aspect … Read More

Wrinkles, liver spots, crows’ feet: what happens to our skin as we age? - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 27, 2018

Michelle Rodrigues, St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne This article is part of our series about skin: why we have it, what it does and what can go wrong. Read other articles in the series here. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The main factors that contribute to how old we … Read More

Non-fluoridated Christchurch does not have better teeth than fluoridated Auckland - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Feb 07, 2017

It seems every time anti-fluoride propagandists present data it is either cherry-picked, distorted or misleading. Often all three. So it is hardly a surprise to find local anti-fluoride propagandists are telling porkies again. They have been promoting this graphic claiming it shows people in “non-fluoridated Christchurch have “better teeth.” But the graphic is based on naive cherry-picking of the data, it ignores the effect different ethnic … Read More

Why are some preventable cancer deaths in Māori and Pacific peoples increasing? - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Oct 31, 2016

Dr Andrea Teng, June Atkinson, Dr George Disney, Prof Nick Wilson, Prof Diana Sarfati, Dr Melissa McLeod, Prof Tony Blakely Work we just published shows some adverse trends in cancer deaths by ethnic group, as well as some favourable trends. In this blog we discuss some of the key findings of this research and what the options are for NZ … Read More

Samoa obesity-gene link not so simple - News

John Kerr Jul 26, 2016

High rates of obesity in Samoa have been linked to a particular version of a gene which is prevalent among the island’s population. However, relying on the often repeated formula of ‘gene X’ causes ‘condition Y’ risks oversimplification, say experts. The results, published today in Nature Genetics, were based on an analysis of DNA samples and basic health data collected from … Read More