Tagged: evolution

Accelerated Christian Education and pseudo-scientific “education” - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 15, 2018

Picture this: grey walls rising up on three sides of you as you sit, hunched over your schoolwork – a science worksheet repudiating the theory of evolution, using the Loch Ness Monster as an example for why Darwin was horrifically, inexcusably wrong.  As you fill in the blanks, copying the answers from the pages of information in … Read More

Book review: Inferior – How Science Got Women Wrong - Scibooks

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Dec 24, 2017

Alongside Naomi Alderman’s The Power, it’s the feminist book everyone’s been reading this year. Angela Saini’s Inferior tackles how science got women wrong and who’s resetting the agenda. Saini is a science journalist with a Masters in Engineering, so she can talk with first-hand experience about some of the issues faced in sciences. Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—and the New … Read More

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

Nose evolution shaped by climate - Guest Work

John Kerr Mar 17, 2017

Your nose looks the way it does thanks, in part, to the climate where your ancient ancestors lived, finds new research. The new study, published today in PLOS Genetics, explores the evolutionary history of the nose, focusing on one specific question: “Has climate adaptation played an important role in influencing variation in human nose shape?” The human nose conditions the temperature and … Read More

Dental plaque DNA shows Neandertals used ‘aspirin’ - News

Jean Balchin Mar 09, 2017

Ancient DNA found on Neandertal teeth has revealed fascinating new insights into the behaviour, diet, use of plant-based medicine and the evolutionary history of our nearest extinct relatives. “Dental plaque traps microorganisms that lived in the mouth and pathogens found in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, as well as bits of food stuck in the teeth—preserving the DNA for … Read More

Weird Science: Beware the meerkat – cuddly critters the world’s most murderous mammals - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 24, 2016

Meerkats – delightful, lovable fluffballs, right? Wrong – they’re actually stone-cold killers, the mammalian world’s most prolific murderers in fact, according to a study that came out in September. The scientists looked at murder rates in 1,000 mammal species, compared the meerkat (sorry) with the others, and found that one-in-five of these cuddly critters is killed in cold … Read More

Crocodilians have long been good mothers - Chthonic Wildlife Ramblings

Brendan Moyle Dec 09, 2016

I like to keep informed about research on crocodilians, even if my work on them as waned in recent years.  As is usually popularly known, crocodilians (which includes true crocodiles, as well as alligators and caimans) survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction that wiped out most dinosaurs.  That leaves both birds and crocodilians as the only surviving archosaurs.  We know from living … Read More