Tagged: extinction

The long night: how the Ice Age drove blue-eyed shag evolution - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Mar 28, 2022

The first snow had started to settle on the bare ground. Soon the shag will have to make a choice. Should it stay to battle the elements and potentially face death during the long night, or attempt a perilous journey to find a new home? By the time sea-ice surrounds its craggy island, creeping up from the south like an … Read More

The little frog with a big legacy - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Nov 11, 2021

In the bowels of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, the little frog waited. In 2005 scientists had released its bones from its sediment tomb on the banks of the Waipara River in North Canterbury. The discoverers – Bruce Marshall, Phil Maxwell, and Al Mannering – had carefully collected the tiny bones that remained and deposited them in … Read More

Humans are driving animals and plants to the edge. But are we really heading into a mass extinction? - News

Guest Author Oct 15, 2021

Michael Hannah, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington   It is now common to refer to the current biodiversity crisis as the sixth mass extinction. But is this true? Are we in the middle of an event on the same scale as the five ancient mass extinctions Earth has experienced? Humans are indeed driving animals and plants to … Read More

Marine life is fleeing the equator to cooler waters. History tells us this could trigger a mass extinction event - The Changing Climate

Guest Author Apr 09, 2021

Anthony Richardson, The University of Queensland; Chhaya Chaudhary, University of Auckland; David Schoeman, University of the Sunshine Coast, and Mark John Costello, University of Auckland The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The … Read More

The Enduring Mystery of Critchfield’s Spruce - The Changing Climate

Guest Author Feb 17, 2021

Zach St. George The first and only time Steve Jackson spoke to Bill Critchfield was in the late 1980s. Critchfield, an authority on the conifers of North America, was at home recovering from a heart attack. Jackson, then a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University, had called looking for advice on how to tell jack pine from Virginia pine. Jackson … Read More

Dire wolves went extinct 13,000 years ago but thanks to new genetic analysis their true story can now be told - Hot off the press

Guest Author Jan 14, 2021

Kieren Mitchell; Alice Mouton, Université de Liège; Angela Perri, Durham University, and Laurent Frantz, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Thanks to the hit television series Game of Thrones, the dire wolf has gained a near-mythical status. But it was a real animal that roamed the Americas for at least 250,000 years, until it became extinct towards the end of the … Read More

Scientists thought these seals evolved in the north. 3-million-year-old fossils from New Zealand suggest otherwise - Hot off the press

Guest Author Nov 12, 2020

James Patrick Rule, Monash University; Erich Fitzgerald, Museums Victoria; Felix Georg Marx, Te Papa Tongarewa, and Justin W. Adams, Monash University A fossil discovery in New Zealand has revealed a new species of monk seal that once called Australasia home. We introduce the three million-year-old seal, Eomonachus belegaerensis, in a paper published today in the Proceedings of the Royal … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 9 – We have to do it - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 22, 2018

This is this idea that we either do this or something that we love dies – what might be referred to as ‘conservation at the barrel of a gun’. Here’s another collection of quotes from the feedback to Kim Hill again – the last one most notably being from one of New Zealand’s foremost conservation biologists: ‘By accepting many introduced … Read More

From Restoration to Reconciliation: Belief 7 – We’re going to end up with a monoculture - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Dec 20, 2018

Here are more comments from my interview with Kim Hill: ‘…we do not have to accept a future that sees our ecosystems as homogeneous with everything else, comprised of international tramp species and the few natives that can persist with them’ ‘…there’s a tonne of [introduced] plants out there that if we let go they’ll change landscapes and there’ll be … Read More

Dead as the moa: oral traditions show that early Māori recognised extinction - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 07, 2018

Priscilla Wehi, Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research; Hēmi Whaanga, University of Waikato, and Murray Cox, Massey University Museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand feature displays of enormous articulated skeletons and giant eggs. The eggs are bigger than two hands put together. This is all that remains of the moa. Tracing extinctions that happened centuries ago … Read More