Tagged: extinction

A tale of two penguins: Bice and Rosie - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Mar 05, 2018

New Zealand has long been considered the cradle of penguin evolution. But two new fossil discoveries, affectionately known as Bice’s, (pronounced Bee-chee’s), and Rosie’s Penguins, are rewriting early penguin evolution and have taken the world by storm. Move aside Penguins of Madagascar; there are some new and cool kids on the block! But how did we get to this … Read More

Poor little Pangolins – Driven headlong to extinction by human greed and stupidity - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 20, 2018

Pangolins are strange little creatures, with their diet of ants and termites, and the entire outer surface of their bodies covered with armour-like scales (face, belly and the inner surfaces of the limbs are either hairy or naked). When in danger, pangolins are able to roll up in a ball, presenting only that armoured surface to a predator. Actually, … Read More

Holy Batman! Giant extinct burrowing bat discovered in New Zealand - News

Jean Balchin Jan 11, 2018

The fossilised remains of a giant burrowing bat that lived in our fine land of New Zealand millions of years ago have been found by a UNSW Sydney-led international team of scientists. Near the town of St Bathans in Central Otago on the South Island was found teeth and bones of the extinct bat. The remains were recovered from 9 … Read More

Size Matters: the challenge of being a green consumer - Chthonic Wildlife Ramblings

Brendan Moyle Jul 26, 2017

The one thing that has really changed in the last century is the size and scale of human effects on the environment.   This isn’t to say we didn’t have impacts before. As humans spread over this globe, many vertebrate species became extinct. Whether it’s the giant mammoths or giant moas, humans alter the world around them.  What … Read More

Introducing the Poūwa: New Zealand’s unique and ill-fated black swan  - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Jul 26, 2017

Step inside a TARDIS and travel to prehistoric New Zealand and the landscape looked very different. Moa roamed the forests, Haast’s Eagle soared in the sky and you would have met a very tall, heavy and potentially grumpy swan. This is the Poūwa – New Zealand’s newest species discovered by my team (published today in Proceedings B) including collaborators from the Otago Palaeogenetics Laboratory (University of Otago), Canterbury Museum and the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa … Read More

The Lark Descending: are non-native birds undervalued in New Zealand? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 23, 2017

By Stephen D Wratten, Lincoln University, New Zealand New Zealand has an audacious plan to protect its native birds. The country has pledged to rid itself of introduced mammalian predators by 2050 and, this year, will spend $20 million on the Battle for the Birds, one of the largest predator control programmes in the country’s history, across … Read More

Conservation genetics of de-extinction: a primer - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

Could we really bring an extinct species back from the dead, and, if we did – what happens next? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Tammy Steeves from the University of Canterbury examines the genetic … Read More

Radical overhaul needed to halt Earth’s sixth great extinction event - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 11, 2016

By Bill Laurance, James Cook University and Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University Life has existed on Earth for roughly 3.7 billion years. During that time we know of five mass extinction events — dramatic episodes when many, if not most, life forms vanished in a geological heartbeat. The most recent of these was the global … Read More

Invasive predators are eating the world’s animals to extinction – and the worst is close to home - Unsorted

Guest Work Sep 25, 2016

By Tim Doherty, Research Fellow, Deakin University; Chris Dickman, Professor in Terrestrial Ecology, University of Sydney; Dale Nimmo, Lecturer in Ecology, Charles Sturt University, and Euan Ritchie, Senior Lecturer in Ecology, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University Invasive species are a threat to wildlife across the … Read More

How climate change killed the dinosaurs’ underwater cousins - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 09, 2016

Valentin Fischer, Université de Liège Imagine dolphins disappearing from the world’s oceans as a result of prolonged climate change and slower evolution. As shocking and unlikely as such an event might be, it happened in the past to a group of marine animals: the ichthyosaurs. These “fish-reptiles” were an iconic group of marine predators from the dinosaur era … Read More

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