Tagged: fat

Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 13, 2018

Kieron Rooney, University of Sydney This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The World Health Organisation recommends limiting “free sugars” to less than 10% of our total energy intake. This equates to around 12 teaspoons a day for an average adult. But more than half of Australian adults exceed … Read More

Dogs, Diets and the Impact of Evolution - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 05, 2018

Yvonne d’Entremont (aka SciBabe) recently posted an article on ‘alternative’ foods and health products for pets, in her usual no-holds-barred style. It’s always good to see pseudoscience called out for what it is, and in the case of pet-focused quackery it’s a message that needs multiple repeats. Why? Because pets are dependent on us, & we have a responsibility … Read More

How to solve the ‘monster’ fatberg problem - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 09, 2017

By Alison Browne, University of Manchester and Mike Foden, Keele University.  Fatbergs – enormous solid masses of oil, grease, wet wipes and other hygiene products that congeal together to cause major blockages – are wreaking havoc on the sewers of cities around the world. A 130 tonne specimen described as a “monster” recently caused backups … Read More

New ‘fat vs. carbs’ study could be misleading for Kiwi diet - News

John Kerr Aug 30, 2017

Chowing down on a high-carb diet could be worse for your overall health than eating a high-fat diet – if you believe the media coverage of a new international study. But a New Zealand expert warns the dietary implications of the findings aren’t that simple, especially for Kiwis. The study The new research, published yesterday in the Lancet, comes … Read More

Who is responsible for stopping NZ’s obesity epidemic? - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Apr 18, 2016

Dr Robyn Toomath Editorial note: In this blog-perspective, obesity expert Dr Robyn Toomath outlines the dogmas and arguments for the ‘individual-responsibility’ explanation and (lack of) solution to the obesity epidemic. She then points to the market failures that render (non-regulated) free-market solutions as doomed to fail. The views in this blog are expanded in greater depth in a book Dr … Read More

An open letter to Cabinet Ministers from 74 health professors calling for a sugary drinks tax - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Apr 02, 2016

An open letter to Cabinet Ministers from 74 health professors calling for a sugary drinks tax In this Public Health Expert blog, we reproduce a letter that appeared in the NZ Herald on 2 April.  Boyd Swinburn, Rod Jackson, and Cliona Ni Mhurchu led the writing.    Dear Cabinet Ministers We are very concerned by New Zealand’s appallingly high rate … Read More

A co-regulatory approach to protecting children from junk food marketing - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Sep 09, 2015

Amanda Wood, PhD candidate, University of Auckland The Health Minister is currently deciding how to best address children’s poor health due to diet-related diseases. It is a good time to reflect not only on the content of those approaches, but also the regulatory frameworks for those approaches. This blog explores a co-regulatory approach that could be applied to the strengthening … Read More

A new book with attitude – but also strong science - Scibooks

SciBooks Sep 30, 2013

by Tony Blakely REVIEW: Appetite for Destruction: Food – the good, the bad and the fatal by Gareth Morgan and Geoff Simmons Public Interest Publishing, October 2013 RRP $35 Gareth Morgan is known as a smart economist and a bit of a stirrer of public debate. Think domestic cat control to save birds. Think “Big … Read More

Fat Rulz OK! - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Jul 13, 2012

Dr Cat Pause is a Fat advocate.  For her “Obese” is a negative term, but Fat is good. She hit the headlines this week as the organiser of New Zealand’s first Fat Studies conference.  Listening to her interviews (see eg TVNZ interview) and reading some media around this event I detect two strains of argument 1. … Continue reading » … Read More

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