Tagged: fertility

A new way to regulate surrogacy to give more certainty to all involved - Guest Work

Guest Work Sep 22, 2017

By Ruth Walker, University of Waikato and Liezl van Zyl, University of Waikato Starting a family through surrogacy is fraught with stresses and uncertainties. For heterosexual couples it is often the last resort after a history of disappointment and even tragedy. Gay couples remain subject to discrimination and stigma when it comes to planning a … Read More

Prenatal genetic screening risks information overload for parents - News

John Kerr Sep 11, 2017

A new report from New Zealand bioethicists warns that prenatal screening technology is developing exponentially – and we need to think hard about how we use it. The Judging Genes & Choosing Children report, funded by the New Zealand Law Foundation, digs into the ethical, legal and social issues posed by a new era of genomic testing for … Read More

Huge drop in men’s sperm levels confirmed by new study – here are the facts - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 31, 2017

By Chris Barratt, University of Dundee Sperm count in men from North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand declined by 50-60% between 1973 and 2011, according to a new study from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Surprisingly, the study, which analysed data on the sperm counts of 42,935 men, found no decline in sperm counts … Read More

Demographic disruption in New Zealand - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 25, 2017

By Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University. This second decade of the 21st century is proving to be one of the most transformative globally and locally, especially in terms of demographic change. The consequences for the ageing of societies from the pipeline effects of the baby boom in the … Read More

The next frontier in reproductive tourism? Genetic modification - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 22, 2016

Rosa Castro, Duke University The birth of the first baby born using a technique called mitochondrial replacement, which uses DNA from three people to “correct” an inherited genetic mutation, was announced on Sept. 27. Mitochondrial replacement or donation allows women who carry mitochondrial diseases to avoid passing them on to their child. These diseases can range from … Read More

Infertility: what’s it all about? - Guest Work

InfectedNZ Nov 21, 2016

Infertility is defined as the inability for a couple having regular unprotected sexual intercourse to have a baby. Globally, the rate of fertility is declining but infertility still affects one in seven couples in New Zealand. In general, humans are generally not considered to be an especially fertile species, with a potential capability of 20-30% reproductive success with each menstrual … Read More

China’s fertility rate in an Asian perspective - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Oct 30, 2015

The media are full of stories of the Chinese government/party decision to abandon the evil one-child policy and replace it with a marginally less evil two-child policy.  It is interesting to see the change presented by the authorities as a response to an ageing population, and I’ve seen various commentaries over the last few years suggesting that this easing … Read More

A gift for someone special - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Dec 31, 2014

Regular readers may have noticed I’ve been a little quiet for the last month. I’ve been feeling ‘under the weather’, to use a common euphemism. In reality I’ve been through a really interesting experience that isn’t often spoken about in public. That must make it the perfect material for a blog, right? Right! Warning: I will mention the word vagina … Read More

Men – girdle your loins with a kilt? - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Apr 18, 2013

An article in the Scottish Medical Journal attempts to address that time-honoured rumour, that “men who wear (Scottish) kilts have better sperm quality and better fertility.” Like some things in life there are disappointments. Firstly, the paper is pay-walled (although Popular Science have linked to a copy on a German-language blog). Then … Read More

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