Tagged: fish

Snapper spillover: Marine reserves boost local population - News

John Kerr Oct 18, 2017

New Zealand’s first marine reserve doesn’t just protect snapper inside the reserve, it also acts as a snapper super-nursery, contributing ten times more fish than expected to the surrounding areas.  The findings come from a new University of Auckland study examining the genetic relationships between fish inside and outside the boundaries of the Goat Island Marine Protected Area (MPA) north … Read More

New Zealand’s fisheries quota management system: on an undeserved pedestal - Guest Work

Guest Work Sep 05, 2017

By Glenn Simmons; Bruce Robertson; (David) Hugh Whittaker, University of Oxford; Elisabeth Slooten; Fiona McCormack, University of Waikato; Graeme Bremner; Nigel Haworth; Simon Francis Thrush, and Steve Dawson In popular imagination, New Zealand’s fisheries management system is a globally recognised story of sustainability, reflecting a “clean and green” environmental … Read More

Sludge, snags, and surreal animals: life aboard a voyage to study the abyss - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 26, 2017

By Tim O’Hara, Museum Victoria Over the past five weeks I led a “voyage of discovery”. That sounds rather pretentious in the 21st century, but it’s still true. My team, aboard the CSIRO managed research vessel, the Investigator, has mapped and sampled an area of the planet that has never been surveyed before. The RV … Read More

The first fossilised heart ever found in a prehistoric animal - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 20, 2016

By John Long, Flinders University Palaeontologists and the famous Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz were once in search of the same thing: a heart. But in our case, it was the search for a fossilised heart. And now we’ve found one. A new discovery, announced today in the journal eLife, shows the perfectly preserved 3D … Read More

How the Japanese tsunami sent marine invaders across the ocean - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 18, 2016

Emma Johnston, UNSW Australia and Jim Carlton, Williams College When the tsunami waters withdrew from the devastated coast of Japan in March 2011 they took with them a vast amount of debris consisting of potentially millions of objects, and sent it rafting across the Pacific Ocean. On this debris came a host of Japanese marine … Read More

Mountains spawned diverse fish - News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Dec 15, 2015

The diverse range of native fish in the South Island are thanks to the uplift of the Southern Alps, new research suggests. Research published today in Nature Geoscience, and led by the University of Otago, has drawn a link between rapid mountain-building in the South Island and the diversification of native fish.  Changes in geography have long been … Read More

Triple S rated- sex, salmon and scicomm - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf Mar 06, 2015

Milking male salmon- it’s all in the hand hold. A long time ago in a place not so far away, a young research scientist spent several weeks each colour-changing autumn ejaculating male salmon for their rich, milky sperm. It certainly wasn’t your everyday job and it wasn’t all as glamorous as it perhaps sounds. In fact it was about … Read More

Lamprey – Living fossils in our midst - Waiology

Waiology Nov 20, 2014

By Cindy Baker Lamprey and hagfish (known as cyclostomes or agnathans) are the only living jawless vertebrates. Over 360 million years old, lampreys swam past herds of drinking dinosaurs, and have survived at least four mass extinctions. The brain of the lamprey is believed to be the closest example of our primal vertebrate ancestors, and lampreys provide important insight into … Read More