Tagged: genome

The complexity of stick insect genomes and why it could help New Zealand conservation - Genomics Aotearoa

Genomics Aotearoa Jul 25, 2019

Dr Ann McCartney We have recently completed the first high-quality genome of a stick insect using link read technology, but what does this mean? And why is a gold standard reference genome important to New Zealand’s conservation efforts? Stick insects are actually biologically interesting. Firstly, in times of stress, they have the ability to become parthenogenic, meaning the females lay … Read More

How does epigenetics fit in? - Genomics Aotearoa

Genomics Aotearoa Dec 14, 2018

Greg Jones The study of epigenetics could well be a key tool in transforming valuable genomic information into useful health outcomes for New Zealanders. But what is epigenetics and why is it important? Epigenetics is the influence of genetic susceptibility combined with the complex interactions of each individual’s environment over their lifetime. An individual’s epigenome is a dynamic personalised profile … Read More

Is your genome really your own? The public and forensic value of DNA - News

Guest Author May 02, 2018

Nathan Scudder, University of Canberra and Dennis McNevin, University of Technology Sydney This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Technologies for amplifying, sequencing and matching DNA have created new opportunities in genomic science. In this series When DNA Talks we look at the ethical and social implications. When Joseph … Read More

Large-scale genetic study provides new insight into the causes of stroke - News

Jean Balchin Mar 19, 2018

An large-scale international genetic study on stroke, based on DNA samples of 520,000 people has identified 22 new genetic risk factors for stroke. Published recently in the journal Nature Genetics, the study’s participants originated from Europe, North and South America, Asia, Africa and Australia, and were compiled from 29 large studies. 67,000 participants in the study had suffered a stroke. From … Read More

Why Barbra Streisand’s cloned dogs aren’t identical to the original pet - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 05, 2018

Russell Bonduriansky, UNSW This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could bring back a deceased loved one? Such ideas used to be pure science fiction, but recent advances in biotechnology seem to have brought this possibility within reach (at least for the wealthy). When American … Read More

Deciphering the genetic landscape of Ireland - News

Jean Balchin Feb 07, 2018

FineSTRUCTURE analysis demonstrates that haplotypes mirror geography across the British Isles as illustrated in A.) FineSTRUCTURE clustering dendrogram B.) Principle Component space. Administrative boundaries in map sourced from GADM (https://gadm.org). A recent study in PLOS Genetics has revealed a previously hidden genetic landscape of Ireland, shaped through geography and historical migrations. The genome-wide study, led by Ross Byrne and … Read More

How palaeolithic humans shaped the modern genome - News

Jean Balchin Jan 31, 2018

When we think about our ancestry, we think about our grandmothers and grandfathers – and, if we have photo albums nearby, or a family member interested in genealogy, we might know a bit more about our great-grandmothers, great-grandfathers, and so on. I remember traveling around Scotland a few years ago, and chancing upon a small churchyard. Every second gravestone, most … Read More

Why finding new HIV targets takes so long: Some basics about basic research - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 09, 2018

Christy Gaines, University of Maryland, Baltimore County This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Although great strides have been made at combating human immunodeficiency virus, leading to better quality of life and a longer life expectancy for those living with the virus, significant problems remain. As of 2016, 36.7 … Read More

Parts of our genome are actually viral - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Nov 04, 2016

I’ve just come across a most excellent article by the Genetic Literacy Project. In it, Nicholas Staropoli notes that a proportion of the human genome actually has viral origins. This might sound a bit strange – after all, we tend to think of viruses as our enemies (smallpox, measles, and the human papilloma virus come to mind). But, as … Read More

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