Tagged: History

Opinion: Let’s celebrate the Humanities more - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Mar 06, 2018

Recently, there has been a great deal of hullabaloo on my Facebook timeline as people squabble over whether so-called ”hard” subjects like calculus and physics are inherently better and more difficult than the alternative, ”soft” subjects like English, drama and photography. Filip Vachuda, Onehunga High School’s academic runner-up for 2017, began ”DuxGate” when he wrote he missed out on dux … Read More

Strong sense of cultural identity drives boom in Māori business - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 27, 2018

Jason Paul Mika, Massey University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Māori entrepreneurs with a strong sense of cultural identity and guardianship over the land and the sea are driving a boom in Māori business. Māori businesses now account for an economic asset base of more than … Read More

How we decide who and what we care about – and whether robots stand a chance - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 23, 2018

Dan Crimston, The University of Queensland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. When psychologists talk about a “moral circle” they are referring to how far we extend our moral consideration towards others. That is, whether we care about the well-being of others, and act accordingly. For most of us, the … Read More

Prehistoric wine discovered in inaccessible caves forces a rethink of ancient Sicilian culture - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 15, 2018

Davide Tanasi, University of South Florida This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Monte Kronio rises 1,300 feet above the geothermally active landscape of southwestern Sicily. Hidden in its bowels is a labyrinthine system of caves, filled with hot sulfuric vapors. At lower levels, these caves average 99 degrees Fahrenheit and … Read More

How comet dust has enabled us to trace the history of the Solar System - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 29, 2018

Donia Baklouti, Université Paris Sud – Université Paris-Saclay; Anaïs Bardyn, Carnegie Science, and Hervé Cottin, Université Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne (UPEC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. We are not used to considering dust as a valuable material – unless it comes from space. And … Read More

I could have danced all night: Music and dance in convict times - News

Jean Balchin Jan 24, 2018

A great many Australians and New Zealanders can trace their ancestry back to a convict or two, deported by the British government to various penal colonies in Australia between 1788 and 1868. In the early 17th century, the British government began transporting convicts overseas to American colonies. The American Revolution put a stop to all this however, and an alternative site was … Read More

No Ordinary Woman: The Life of Edith Penrose - The Dismal Science

Paul Walker Jan 22, 2018

At the Marginal Revolution blog Tyler Cowen writes on the new biography of economist Edith Penrose, No Ordinary Woman: The Life of Edith Penrose, by Angela Penrose. Cowen writes, What a dramatic and eventful book. Edith Penrose (1914-1996) is a not so well-known but highly underrated economist, with her … Read More

Exploring Scotland’s Loneliest islands - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 18, 2018

Out in the North Atlantic exist a collection of wild islands, rising in jagged ranks off the northwest coast of Scotland. Leaving my cosy cottage on Lewis, I set off across miles of ocean to the splintery archipelago of St Kilda, abandoned over a century ago. Here, the weather is a fickle, flighty mistress, cloaking the islands in mist … Read More

From testosterone to dogs, and physics for babies: five fascinating books in 2017 - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 20, 2017

George Aranda, Deakin University In my mild-mannered persona as an academic in science education, I teach and research ways that science can be better taught in Australia and globally. But every year I also explore the world of science books. I scope what’s new and interesting for my not-for-profit science book blog, and the Big Ideas … Read More

A Statue of Merit: Dr Margaret Cruickshank and the 1918 influenza pandemic - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Sep 12, 2017

Nick Wilson, Ben Schrader, Geoff Rice, Christine Clement, George Thomson, Catharine Ferguson, Michael Baker Some statues are getting bad press at present – and rightly so for the Confederate military statues which represent the racist history of the Southern United States. But in this blog we briefly look at a particular New Zealand statue that we think characterises some of … Read More