Tagged: human impacts

Bright city lights are keeping ocean predators awake and hungry - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 27, 2016

By Damon Bolton, UNSW Australia; Alistair Becker; Emma Johnston, UNSW Australia; Graeme Clark, UNSW Australia; Katherine Dafforn, UNSW Australia, and Mariana Mayer-Pinto, UNSW Australia Light pollution is changing the day-night cycle of some fish, dramatically affecting their feeding behaviour, according to our recently published study. In one of the … Read More

New Zealand kelp forests under threat as total allowable catch limits announced - Science Life

Rebecca McLeod Sep 24, 2010

I am still reeling from an announcement made yesterday by the Minster of Fisheries and Aquaculture Phil Heatley regarding the setting of the total allowable “catch” for giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). I thought I might try and calm down a little before I wrote this post, but the 20 or so emails that greeted me this morning from marine ecologists … Read More

World Heritage Status: Added protection, or unintended destruction? - Science Life

Rebecca McLeod May 18, 2010

Sometimes I curse being an environmental scientist. Particularly when I’m traveling overseas. While my fellow travelers gaze in awe at the natural wonders around them, I can’t help but see signs of pollution and degradation. I have just returned from a stint in Vietnam where I visited a World Heritage Area. It really got me thinking… When UNESCO (the United … Read More

Australian media on a mission to make scientists look dodgy - Science Life

Rebecca McLeod Dec 21, 2009

Yesterday 895,000 Australians (and this one Kiwi) woke up to the headline “HOPES FADE IN COPENHAGEN, RISE ON THE REEF” in a national newspaper. As one who is always up for a bit of optimism I began reading… but by the second line my hopes were somewhat dashed: “Scientists ‘crying wolf’ over coral”. This front page story reported the … Read More

A+ for Australian Marine Scientists - Science Life

Rebecca McLeod Dec 04, 2009

The Marine Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Report Card Australia 2009 has just been released. Hiding behind the long-winded name is an excellent resource - a website-based state-of-knowledge of how climate change is likely to affect Australia's marine life, with expert opinions from more than 70 marine scientists across the country. Read More