Tagged: immigration

Opinion: Economic growth within Environmental limits - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Apr 20, 2018

That was the title of a speech David Parker gave a couple of weeks ago.  Parker is, as you will recall, a man wearing many hats: Minister for the Environment, Associate Minister of Finance, Minister for Trade and Export Growth, and Attorney-General.  Since he was speaking to a seminar organised by the Resource Management Law Association, this speech looked … Read More

Population and real GDP per capita - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Apr 09, 2018

I noticed a few comments to another of my posts about possible links between population size and economic performance. My working assumption is that, on average, across all countries, there isn’t any such relationship. Apart from anything else, if there were a positive relationship –  that was more than chance –  it would suggest that two countries … Read More

Costly Discrimination - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Jan 15, 2018

Danish kids are happy to pay to avoid having to work with someone of a different ethnicity. In this clever field experiment, Danish kids with traditionally Danish-sounding names were willing to forego expected earnings in order to avoid being paired with someone with a Muslim-sounding name – and vice-versa. It’s a great experimental design. Kids do a first round … Read More

Immigration policy and emissions targets - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Oct 01, 2017

I’ve written a few posts in recent months about the connections between our immigration policy – materially boosting our population growth rate – and New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions (for example here and here).  New Zealand is unusual because, as the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has highlighted: • we have a fairly high rate of trend population growth, … Read More

MBIE on how emissions reductions targets interact with immigration policy - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Jul 13, 2017

        No, that blank space wasn’t a mistake.  It was the sum total of everything MBIE has written or commissioned (analysis, advice, research, or whatever), in the period since the start of 2014 on how the appropriate or optimal immigration policy for New Zealand might be affected by commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. At the start … Read More

Emissions policy and immigration policy - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Jun 21, 2017

A month or so ago I ran a couple of posts on New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions in international context.  Readers may recall that New Zealand now has the second highest emissions per unit of GDP of any OECD country, having moved up from sixth in 1990.     As part of the Paris climate change accord process, New … Read More

More people means more emissions. So how about fewer people? - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 24, 2017

I’ve never had that much interest in climate change.  Perhaps it comes from living in Wellington.   If average local temperatures were a couple of degrees warmer here most people would be quite happy.    And as successive earthquakes seem to have the South Island pushing under the North Island, raising the land levels around here –  you can … Read More

New Zealanders’ population choices - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 20, 2017

The other day Statistics New Zealand released the annual data on New Zealand birth rates.  There was some coverage of the continuing drop in teen birth rates (it was what SNZ highlighted), but the chart that caught my eye was this one.     I’d been under the impression that New Zealand’s birth rate was at, or just … Read More

What (e/im)migration data to use when - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 02, 2017

I was having a conversation with someone the other day, trying to explain both what data there were on movements of people into (and out of) New Zealand, and which data was useful for what purpose.  Reflecting on that afterwards, it seemed that a post might be useful.  This follows on from my post last week on the Herald’s misleading … Read More

Natural resources: Norway and the UK - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell Mar 31, 2017

The contribution of natural resources to the prosperity of nations is much-debated.   There is little doubt that a) natural resources can be wasted, mismanaged etc, such that a country well-provided for by nature still ends up pretty poor (Zambia is my favourite example, partly because I worked there), and b) that it is perfectly feasible for some countries to do … Read More