Tagged: Māori

Mānuka honey: who really owns the name and the knowledge - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 07, 2018

Jessica C Lai, Victoria University of Wellington Adulterated honey and fake mānuka honey have repeatedly made headlines in recent years. The arguments around adulterated honey are relatively simple. These honeys are diluted with cheaper syrups and their lack of authenticity is unquestionable. The discourse around mānuka honey is different, as there are serious questions about what … Read More

Dead as the moa: oral traditions show that early Māori recognised extinction - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 07, 2018

Priscilla Wehi, Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research; Hēmi Whaanga, University of Waikato, and Murray Cox, Massey University Museums throughout Aotearoa New Zealand feature displays of enormous articulated skeletons and giant eggs. The eggs are bigger than two hands put together. This is all that remains of the moa. Tracing extinctions that happened centuries ago … Read More

Fossil Lucky Dip from a Lost World - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Jul 10, 2018

I’m lying on a beautiful golden sand beach. The bright sun is beating down upon me. I could be on an isolated, tropical island, if not for the lone giant moa sculpture looming above my head. This sentinel to a lost world stands at the aptly named Old Bones Backpackers at Awamoa, (originally named Te Awa Kōkōmuka), south of Oamaru. Read More

How much of Māori:European mortality inequalities are due to socioeconomic position and tobacco? - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Jun 15, 2018

Prof Tony Blakely, Dr Andrea Teng, Prof Nick Wilson Policy-makers need to know how much of ethnic inequalities in health are due to socioeconomic position and tobacco smoking, but quantifying this is surprisingly difficult. In this Blog, and accompanying video, we summarize new research using NZ’s linked census-mortality data, blended with innovative new ‘counterfactual’ methods to determine causal relationships … Read More

Anti-fluoridationist Paul Connett misrepresents NZ data - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Apr 12, 2018

Here is another post in my series critiquing a PowerPoint presentation of Paul Connett – a leading US anti-fluoridation activist. Slide 110 from Paul Connett’s presentation prepared for his planned meeting at Parliament Buildings last February. Paul prepared this for a meeting in New Zealand Parliament buildings last February. Although only three MPs turned up his presentation is important as it … Read More

Audrey Eagle’s Botanical Drawings - A History of NZ Science in 25 Objects

Jean Balchin Mar 28, 2018

When I was a child, my father and I would sit at the kitchen table after tea, armed with a set of Reeve’s watercolour paints, a grubby cup of water, sheets of cartridge paper and various picture books depicting the flora and fauna of Great Britain. My Dad was quite the artist, and he patiently taught me how … Read More

A century of health inequalities in NZ – new data - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Mar 26, 2018

Prof Nick Wilson, Dr Matt Boyd, Dr Andrea Teng, Prof Tony Blakely Everyone knows that socio-economic inequalities in health exist – in recent times. But one thing we do not know is whether they have always been there. We have just published a study that looks at two historical datasets – with one of these suggesting life span differences by … Read More

Strong sense of cultural identity drives boom in Māori business - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 27, 2018

Jason Paul Mika, Massey University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Māori entrepreneurs with a strong sense of cultural identity and guardianship over the land and the sea are driving a boom in Māori business. Māori businesses now account for an economic asset base of more than … Read More

Tertiary access isn’t about tertiary fees - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Jan 19, 2018

If you want to improve university enrollment rates among Maori and Pasifika kids, you should look at what’s going on earlier in the education system. Lisa Meehan, Gail Pacheco and Zoe Pushon find that ethnic gaps in school performance are the largest contributors to ethnic gaps in university enrollment rates. Those gaps matter far more than differences in socioeconomic … Read More

Kia ora: how Māori borrowings shape New Zealand English - Lippy Linguist

Andreea Calude Sep 29, 2017

New Zealand English is one of the youngest dialects of English. It exhibits a number of unique features and the use of words from the indigenous Māori language is probably the most salient and easily recognisable one. In our latest research, we found that the process by which Māori words are most frequently borrowed resembles the Darwinian concept of … Read More