Tagged: Mars

So a helicopter flew on Mars for the first time. A space physicist explains why that’s such a big deal - News

Guest Author Apr 21, 2021

Gail Iles, RMIT University Yesterday at 9pm Australian Eastern standard time, the Ingenuity helicopter — which landed on Mars with the Perseverance rover in February — took off from the Martian surface. More importantly, it hovered for about 30 seconds, three metres above the surface and came right back down again. It may not sound like a huge … Read More

How did NASA’s Martian rover come to land in a crater named after a tiny Balkan village? - News

Guest Author Mar 01, 2021

Robert Greenberg, University of Auckland The world was excited by the news last week that NASA’s Perseverance rover had successfully landed in a Martian crater. The rover will now set about collecting samples from what scientists say was an ancient lake fed by a river. The name of this exotic Martian crater is Jezero. As a South Slavic … Read More

As the Perseverance rover lands on Mars, there’s a lot we already know about the red planet from meteorites found on Earth - News

Guest Author Feb 19, 2021

James Scott, University of Otago NASA’s Perseverance rover successfully touched down on Mars this morning, and has already begun beaming back images. Hello, world. My first look at my forever home. #CountdownToMars pic.twitter.com/dkM9jE9I6X — NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover (@NASAPersevere) February 18, 2021 But people might be surprised to learn … Read More

Great conjunctions and the star/comet of Bethlehem - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Dec 20, 2020

[avatar user=”duncansteel” size=”thumbnail” align=”right” /] There have been many articles in the mass media about the ‘Great Conjunction’ between Jupiter and Saturn that will occur on December 21st. Some of them have been good, and informative. Many have been fairly poor. Others have been… well, weird. Some writers have imagined that there is something vitally significant about the conjunction (the … Read More

First recorded ‘marsquakes’ reveal the red planet’s rumbling guts - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 25, 2020

Katarina Miljkovic We’ve all heard of earthquakes, but what about marsquakes? NASA’s InSight mission has, for the first time, recorded seismic activity coming from Mars’ interior. The observations, recorded in 2019 and published today, will help understand the red planet’s internal structure, composition and dynamics. It opens a new chapter in planetary geophysics and exploration. The NASA InSight … Read More

Why Mars is cold despite an atmosphere of mostly carbon dioxide - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Nov 06, 2019

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz If tiny concentrations of carbon dioxide can hold enough heat to create a global warming impact on Earth, … Read More

Colonising Mars means contaminating Mars – and never knowing for sure if it had its own native life - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 20, 2018

David Weintraub, Vanderbilt University The closest place in the universe where extraterrestrial life might exist is Mars, and human beings are poised to attempt to colonise this planetary neighbour within the next decade. Before that happens, we need to recognise that a very real possibility exists that the first human steps on the Martian surface will lead … Read More

We’re Going Multiplanetary: The Quest for New Earths - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 29, 2018

Becky Turner Theoretical physicist and one-man-phenomenon Stephen Hawking contributed a wealth of knowledge to mankind during his lifetime. One of his recommendations was that humans would need to colonise other planets in the next hundred years to avoid annihilation. His fears took the form of deadly viruses, nuclear war, asteroid impacts, and global warming. In order to avoid … Read More