Tagged: mātauranga māori

What’s the problem with all science being “done” in English? - Lippy Linguist

Andreea Calude Jan 24, 2020

I’ve been listening to a wonderful podcast this morning which left me thinking. The podcast was a 30-min well-spent break, in the company of Daniel Midgley and Michael Gordin.  You might know Daniel Midgley from the Talk the Talk linguistics podcast. Michael Gordin is the author of “Scientific Babel”, which concerns the history of how English came … Read More

New era for Ngāti Kuri and Auckland Museum - Mātau Taiao

Guest Author Nov 18, 2019

Words and images by Jacqui Gibson Gone are Auckland Museum’s days of doing science using a museum-centric academic approach, after Māori land rights holders Ngāti Kuri gave the museum an ultimatum. Tom Trnski holding a fossilised whale tooth from the Far North. Aussie-born Head of Natural Sciences at Auckland Museum Tom Trnski admits his first pepeha at Waiora marae … Read More

Embracing Mātauranga Māori and science – Suffrage 125 - Suffrage 125

Guest Author Sep 20, 2018

Yvonne Taura When I was young and growing up in Australia, becoming a scientist was far from my ideal career path. I shied away from anything to do with science, physics, or mathematics as the room was always filled with boys – and, to be honest, it was all a little intimidating. Instead, I moved more towards the creative … Read More

Te Awaroa – Voice of the River - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 19, 2017

Last week, Centre of Research Excellence Te Pūnaha Matatini hosted #WaiNZ, a national conversation providing New Zealanders with an opportunity to read blog posts and other media from key influencers talking about their relationships with water. With permission, Sciblogs is re-publishing some of the blog posts here, starting with Dan Hikuroa‘s call to listen to the voice of the river.  … Read More

Matariki: reintroducing the tradition of Māori New Year celebrations - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 30, 2017

Rangi Matamua, Waikato University The Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, is one of the most obvious star groups in the night sky, identifiable to the naked eye. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the star cluster is known as Matariki. This name is a truncated version of the saying “Ngā mata o te ariki Tāwhirimātea” meaning “the eye of the god … Read More

Mātauranga Māori and kererū conservation - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall Aug 18, 2016

Letting people harvest New Zealand’s protected wood pigeon can create a win-win outcome for all, says conservationist Len Gillman. Len Gillman For centuries, Māori carefully managed and harvested kererū as an important food source. As kaitiaki (environmental guardians), communities will place a rāhui (temporary ban) on specific animals or plants if numbers get too low, to allow them to recover. This mātauranga Māori (indigenous knowledge) dates back to well … Read More

Deciphering Matariki: science lessons from star lore - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall Jun 09, 2016

For astronomy researcher Dr Rangi Matamua, traditional Māori star knowledge and Western science are not enemies but allies. His latest project uses historic star lore to shed light on modern environmental issues – and is also a deeply personal quest that began with a dying grandfather’s wish. Rangi Matamua Rangi Matamua’s path is literally written in the stars. Rangi (Ngai … Read More

Powering potential in young Māori - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall May 19, 2016

Teachers have been shown to underestimate Māori children’s academic capabilities, which their achievements end up reflecting. But Pūhoro, a forward-thinking science academy, has now been set up to support Māori youth in reaching their true potential. Naomi Manu and Mana Vautier give us the lowdown. One thing that people really don’t like to talk about is prejudice. But we all have … Read More

Reshaping the mould for Māori obesity research - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall Apr 29, 2016

What has the Māori word for ‘chieftainship’ got to do with a team of scientists looking at obesity in Northland? Answer: the researchers broke the scientific mould by putting the Māori communities — not scientists — in the leading role. Researcher Ricky Bell tells us how they did it. Rangatiratanga is a powerful word.  It’s loosely translated to mean chieftainship, authority, leadership.  But … Read More

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