Tagged: medicine

It’s time for academics to stand up against bad science - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Jan 12, 2018

Shocking revelations around a clinical trial of a new tuberculosis vaccine are just the tip of the iceberg. Maintaining public trust in science depends on open science. Ten years ago, Dr Ben Goldacre published Bad Science, a book described by The Economist as “a fine lesson in how to skewer the enemies of reason … Read More

Novelty in science – real necessity or distracting obsession? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 10, 2018

Jalees Rehman, University of Illinois at Chicago This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. In a recent survey of over 1,500 scientists, more than 70 percent of them reported having been unable to reproduce other scientists’ findings at least once. Roughly half of the surveyed scientists ran into problems trying … Read More

Traditional Chinese medicine: Eye of newt and toe of frog - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Dec 09, 2017

‘Double, double toil and trouble; fire burn, and cauldron bubble’ chant the three witches in the cavern, lightening flashing outside, in Act 4, Scene 1 of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. It’s images like these, conjured up by the great bard himself, that I associate with traditional Chinese medicines and herbal remedies. The implied promise that if I take this concoction, my health … Read More

A Statue of Merit: Dr Margaret Cruickshank and the 1918 influenza pandemic - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Sep 12, 2017

Nick Wilson, Ben Schrader, Geoff Rice, Christine Clement, George Thomson, Catharine Ferguson, Michael Baker Some statues are getting bad press at present – and rightly so for the Confederate military statues which represent the racist history of the Southern United States. But in this blog we briefly look at a particular New Zealand statue that we think characterises some of … Read More

Is it time to drop “complete the course” message for antibiotics? - News

Jean Balchin Jul 27, 2017

The commonly held belief that patients should “complete the course” of antibiotics to avoid antibiotic resistance is not backed by evidence and should be dropped, argue experts in The BMJ (The British Medical Journal) today. According to Professor Martin Llewelyn at Brighton and Sussex Medical School and colleagues, patients are actually put at unnecessary risk from antibiotic resistance when treatment is given … Read More

Doctors and nurses can’t always tell if someone’s drunk or on drugs, and misdiagnosis can be dangerous - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 05, 2017

Lauren Monds, Research Fellow in Addiction Medicine, Research Officer in Forensic Psychology, University of Sydney and Celine van Golde, Associate Lecturer in Forensic Psychology, University of Sydney Bob has arrived at the emergency department at 10am on a Tuesday after breaking several fingers slamming his hand in a car door. Bob is quite anxious; he … Read More

Seven tips for surviving the apocalypse - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 10, 2017

By Lewis Dartnell, University of Westminster Billionaires who have made their fortunes in Silicon Valley seem to be worried about the future. So worried in fact, that some of them are reportedly buying vast estates in places such as New Zealand, as “apocalypse insurance” boltholes to head to in the event of doomsday scenarios such as nuclear attack … Read More

Is it OK for medical students to practise on themselves? - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 25, 2016

By Eleanor Milligan, Griffith University and Liz Fitzmaurice, Griffith University Medical students are practising invasive clinical procedures on themselves and fellow students at home as well as at medical school, a recent New Zealand study has confirmed. These procedures commonly include inserting a cannula, taking blood, and giving injections. Less commonly, students are suturing, … Read More

Disruptive thinking: rocket fuel for Māori innovation - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall Jul 06, 2016

Dr Lance O’Sullivan was kicked out of school for disruptive behaviour. Twice. Now the award-winning Māori doctor has created another kind of disruption – an ambitious new health app that aims to speed up diagnosis and treatment times for common childhood illnesses. Māori innovation is skyrocketing.  The June 2016 statistics say it all: Māori innovation reached almost 65 percent … Read More