Tagged: methods

Children aren’t liabilities in disasters – they can help, if we let them - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 10, 2018

Christine Eriksen, University of Wollongong; Avianto Amri, Macquarie University; Briony Towers, RMIT University; Emma Calgaro, University of Sydney; John Richardson, University of Melbourne; Katharine Haynes, Macquarie University, and Scott McKinnon, University of Wollongong This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original … Read More

How to build a [water] brain - Building blogs of Science

Fabiana Kubke Jun 18, 2010

Whenever I try to teach some aspects of neuronal integration in class, I run into trouble, since most of the neuronal properties are defined by mathematical formulae that describe the electrical properties of neurons that are sometimes difficult for the students to grasp. Without a basic knowledge of electricity, it is hard to build a [...] … Read More

Ed Rubel: The 21st century, a new era for hearing habilitation - Building blogs of Science

Fabiana Kubke Feb 10, 2010

It wasn’t easy to get Professor Ed Rubel down to New Zealand due to his busy schedule, but finally, and thanks to support from the University of Auckland School of Medical Sciences, we did. Yesterday, Prof Rubel delivered a public talk at the Med School: “The 21st Century: A New Era for Hearing Habilitation”. Ed Rubel has [...] … Read More

The ever-changing world of dendritic spines - Building blogs of Science

Fabiana Kubke Dec 18, 2009

Santiago Ramón y Cajal originally described spines in the dendrites of neurons in the cerebellum back in the late 19th century, but it wasn’t until the mid 1950’s with the development of the electron microscope that these structures were shown to be synaptic structures. Although it has been known that the number of dendritic spines [...] … Read More

Synapse #fail, Science #win - Building blogs of Science

Fabiana Kubke Nov 25, 2009

The endbulb or calyx of Held is a very large synapse found in the auditory system. It consists of a very large ‘calyceal’ ending, literally wrapping around the cell body of the postsynaptic neuron. It was first described by H Held in the late 1800’s and has since been shown to characteristically be present in [...] … Read More