Tagged: native species

Reply to the Threatened Species Ambassador - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Feb 21, 2018

In a recent article in The Spinoff, the Department of Conservation’s Threatened Species Ambassador Nicola Toki makes three arguments. First, that native species and introduced predators in New Zealand cannot co-exist. Second, that conservation should be undertaken not only in sanctuaries, but also on private land. And third, that it is the indigenous subset of our biodiversity that fundamentally … Read More

Predator-free is a “mirage” – John Parkes - Politecol

- Wayne Linklater Jan 08, 2018

Killing predators to reduce their impact is an important part of wildlife conservation in New Zealand. It delivers good outcomes for biodiversity, especially for our birds and reptiles. It does not logically or scientifically follow, however, that attempting to eradicate predators from ALL of New Zealand is also a good idea. Indeed, some scientists think that a national … Read More

New homes for our native birds? - Guest Work

Guest Author May 31, 2017

By Prof Phil Seddon, University of Otago. The newly released report from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (Taonga of an island nation) highlights the precarious state of our native avifauna, with one in five of our 168 native bird species at risk of extinction. Birds are highly visible but also highly vulnerable indicators of habitat change, not just … Read More

Maybe we can, but should we? Deciding whether to bring back extinct species - Guest Work

Guest Author May 19, 2017

Gwenllian Iacona, The University of Queensland and Iadine Chadès, CSIRO De-extinction – the science of reviving species that have been lost – has moved from the realm of science-fiction to something that is now nearly feasible. Some types of lost mammals, birds or frogs may soon be able to be revived through de-extinction technologies. Read More

Are deer sort of like moa? - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Apr 12, 2017

In this two-part series, Dr Jamie Steer ponders whether the ‘deer are like moa’ debate has passed its use-by date. Writing on the impacts of introduced deer in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute in 1892, the Reverend P. Walsh argued that New Zealand’s native forests were poorly equipped to deal with grazing mammals. Taking the pre-human forest as … Read More

Which scientists have got it right about introduced wildlife in New Zealand? - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 28, 2016

By Jamie Steer and Rowan Taylor Scientists tend to shape our beliefs about wildlife in New Zealand, and particularly how we think of introduced species. But what are we to think when scientists disagree? Conservation biologists, for example, tell us that introduced wildlife are invasive environmental and economic pests while fisheries and waterfowl biologists tell us that they are valued … Read More

Protecting New Zealand’s natural treasures - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall Feb 27, 2016

Tangata Whenua — People of the Land — is the name that Māori call themselves as indigenous New Zealanders, and likely signifies the deep roots they have to this green and blue place of jagged peaks and valleys.  The land sustains us. It carries paths to the future as well as ties to the past: whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te … Read More

Food webs: Who eats who, and what does that tell us? - Waiology

Waiology Dec 02, 2014

By Elizabeth Graham Food webs are maps of “who eats who” within an ecosystem (Figure 1a). Each node, or point, in the web represents a species or group of organisms; nodes are connected by a link if there is a known feeding relationship between the two groups. Though they are built on simple predator-prey relationships, food webs integrate complex information … Read More

Lamprey – Living fossils in our midst - Waiology

Waiology Nov 20, 2014

By Cindy Baker Lamprey and hagfish (known as cyclostomes or agnathans) are the only living jawless vertebrates. Over 360 million years old, lampreys swam past herds of drinking dinosaurs, and have survived at least four mass extinctions. The brain of the lamprey is believed to be the closest example of our primal vertebrate ancestors, and lampreys provide important insight into … Read More

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