Tagged: Nature

Bursting the Conservation Bubble with Birds - Up and Atom

Kimberley Collins Oct 16, 2018

As another Bird of the Year draws to a close, Kimberley Collins reflects on why this kind of fun and uplifting advocacy is an important way to get New Zealanders to take an interest in conservation. Every year, thousands of New Zealanders flock to the polls to vote for their favourite bird. Well-known and enthusiastic “campaign managers” hit the streets (and … Read More

Cool! Antarctic krill can turn microplastics into nanoplastics - News

Jean Balchin Mar 09, 2018

A groundbreaking Griffith University study has found Antarctic krill which ingest microplastics are able to turn them into nanoplastics through digestion. What are Krill? Krill is a general term used to refer to around 85 species of free-swimming crustaceans called euphausiids, of which Antarctic krill is one species. Antarctic krill are one of the most abundant and successful animal species on … Read More

Why telling people they could get sick in the future won’t persuade them to be healthy now - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 22, 2018

Adam Bulley, The University of Queensland and Thomas Suddendorf, The University of Queensland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Everyone knows smoking, consuming too much sugar and drinking too much alcohol will harm our long-term health – but many of us do these things anyway. Why? Of course, … Read More

Proving HPV vaccines really prevent cancer - Diplomatic Immunity

Helen Petousis Harris Feb 19, 2018

In the clinical trials for HPV vaccines cervical cancer was not a primary endpoint. An endpoint in a clinical trial is a disease or a symptom of interest. I want to explain why cancer was not an endpoint these efficacy studies. Instead surrogate endpoints were used. Why not, given that is what the investigators wanted to prevent? Because you can’t … Read More

Does science blogging still matter? Yes. Yes, it does. - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 07, 2018

That’s the premise of an article in Nature (Brown & Woolston, 2018), which I discovered via the excellent Debunking Denialism on Facebook (and if that’s not a good example of how various social media are interlinked, I don’t know what is). Since mine is a science blog, obviously I was interested in the Nature narrative. Brown & Woolston believe … Read More

Revenge – sweet from the age of six - News

Jean Balchin Dec 20, 2017

Both chimpanzees and  six-year-old children love seeing punishment doled out, even if it costs them, according to a paper published online this week in Nature Human Behaviour. These findings reveal new insights about the evolution of peer-punishment as a means to enforce social norms and ensure cooperation. We know from previous research that humans and some animal species experience … Read More

Mapping the link between biodiversity and wellbeing – NatureBuzz - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal Apr 24, 2017

In this week’s Psychology Report I talked with Laurie Parma from the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge in England, about Nature Buzz (iTunes / Android)- the new research application they have developed to explore the links between nature and well-being.     Have a read of this conversation to understand more … Read More

Antibody injections could be stepping stone to HIV vaccine - Guest Work

Guest Author May 10, 2016

By Ivy Shih, The Conversation Imagine a seasonal jab of antibodies that could neutralise the HIV virus. Such an injection could prove to be next best alternative to an HIV vaccine, which has proven elusive to date. American and German researchers have demonstrated that by injecting macaques with neutralising antibodies, they successfully shielded the monkeys from HIV infection … Read More

We need to talk about how we fund conservation - The Nature of Things

Marie Brown Oct 23, 2015

Environment Aotearoa 2015 confirmed what many of us already knew: our natural heritage is in serious trouble.[i] Despite decades of law, policy and grass-roots conservation initiatives our biodiversity is rapidly declining because of habitat loss, fragmentation and change; pollution; impacts of invasive species; macro scale changes such as ocean acidification and a host of other negative … Read More

Will new antibiotic Teixobactin save us all? Umm, not quite. - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Jan 08, 2015

Researchers in Germany and the USA have just published a paper in the journal Nature describing a new antibiotic they have called Teixobactin (1). This study is good news; the World Health Organization warned last year that cancer chemotherapy and routine surgery will soon become life-threateningly risky because of the worldwide rise in antibiotic-resistant … Read More