Tagged: oceans

Safe to go in the water? The ‘bleeding legs’ sea flea mystery - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf Aug 10, 2017

The story has gone viral around the world  – a teenager, Sam Kanizay, dips his legs in the water after soccer practice in Melbourne and emerges bleeding profusely, and in hospital for days, with dramatic headlines of mysterious flesh eating sea creatures to blame. So what’s the likely culprit and do we need to fear getting in the water here? … Read More

Deep water corals glow in the dark to survive - News

Jean Balchin Jul 05, 2017

It has long been established that corals in shallow waters glow because of fluorescent proteins that act as sunblock, protecting the endangered species from the sun’s intense rays. As any kiwi can attest, too much sunlight is bad for humans. Excess sunlight is also detrimental to corals. Some shallow water corals produce fluorescent proteins to block excessive sunlight that could … Read More

How we discovered pollution-poisoned crustaceans in the Mariana Trench - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 21, 2017

By Alan Jamieson, Newcastle University Even animals from the deepest places on Earth have accumulated pollutants made by humans. That’s the unfortunate finding of a new study by myself with colleagues from the University of Aberdeen and the James Hutton Institute, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. Up until now I have tended to stick to the nice … Read More

Marine reserve overhaul – how to make the most of this opportunity - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 10, 2016

By Associate Professor Mark Costello and Dr Daniel Hikuroa If you care about having fish to eat, recreational fishing, and enjoying a natural environment then you should be responding to the governments consultation document on a proposed Marine Protected Areas Act by 5pm tomorrow Friday 11th March 2016. Along with the recent decision to extend the Kermadec Islands … Read More

The race to fish: how fishing subsidies are emptying our oceans - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 19, 2015

Rashid Sumaila, University of British Columbia Fish numbers are rapidly dwindling globally, and fishery subsidies are one of the key drivers behind this decline. In 2009, these subsidies totalled about US$35 billion, creating incentives for fishers around the world to increase their catch. But this short-term “race to fish” is jeopardising the long-term environmental, social, and economic … Read More

How you can help scientists track how marine life reacts to climate change - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 07, 2015

Gretta Pecl, University of Tasmania; Jemina Stuart-Smith, University of Tasmania; Jennifer Sunday, University of British Columbia , and Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, University of Newcastle There are many factors that determine where a marine species will find a place to call home, such as wave exposure, salinity, depth, habitat and where other friend or … Read More

Visualising 268,000 tonnes of floating plastic in the world’s oceans - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 12, 2014

by Laurent Lebreton, data scientist at dumpark A recent study on marine plastic pollution published in the journal PlosOne estimates that some 5.25 trillion plastic particles weighing more than 268.000 tonnes are floating on the world’s oceans. Over a six-year period, researchers from six different countries collected plastic density data from 24 expeditions into the five main oceanic basins … Read More

Models, oil spills and moving the debate forward - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Oct 23, 2013

The Greenpeace-commissioned report looking at the estimated impact of a deep water oil well leak in New Zealand waters has received a lot of attention this morning and for good reason. In the whole argument over oil exploration and whether we should drill or not, there’s been little science-based public discussion of the impact of a spill. Sure, … Read More

Visualising plastic pollution in the world's oceans - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 26, 2013

by Laurent Lebreton While the common misconception of global plastic pollution in our oceans is based on descriptions of the north Pacific gyre being a trash island the size of Texas, the reality is much more complicated. Although plastic is not biodegradable unlike other floating marine debris, it is eventually broken down by the sunlight into microscopic particles that … Read More