Tagged: physics

Remembering Stephen Hawking - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 15, 2018

Yesterday I was incredibly saddened to hear about the passing of world-renowned cosmologist and pioneer in theoretical physics, Stephen Hawking. Here are a collection of tributes to the great man.  Professor David Wiltshire, Theoretical Physicist, University of Canterbury, comments: Stephen Hawking. Wikimedia Commons. “Stephen was the most courageous person I have known. He had to face his … Read More

Opinion: Let’s celebrate the Humanities more - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Mar 06, 2018

Recently, there has been a great deal of hullabaloo on my Facebook timeline as people squabble over whether so-called ”hard” subjects like calculus and physics are inherently better and more difficult than the alternative, ”soft” subjects like English, drama and photography. Filip Vachuda, Onehunga High School’s academic runner-up for 2017, began ”DuxGate” when he wrote he missed out on dux … Read More

How fair is it for just three people to receive the Nobel Prize in physics? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 24, 2018

Caroline Wagner, The Ohio State University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The Nobel Foundation statutes decree that “in no case” can a Nobel Prize be divided between more than three people. So it may not raise many eyebrows that the 2017 award in physics went to just … Read More

Science Tank | Schrodinger’s cat & the double slit experiment - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 11, 2018

In 1935, an Austrian physicist named Erwin Schrödinger published his “Schrödinger’s Cat” thought experiment to explain superposition (a quantum mechanics principle stating that something exists in all possible states until it is directly observed or measured, at which point it exists only in one of its possible states). Erwin Schrödinger, staring intently at you. Wikimedia Commons. The thought … Read More

From testosterone to dogs, and physics for babies: five fascinating books in 2017 - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 20, 2017

George Aranda, Deakin University In my mild-mannered persona as an academic in science education, I teach and research ways that science can be better taught in Australia and globally. But every year I also explore the world of science books. I scope what’s new and interesting for my not-for-profit science book blog, and the Big Ideas … Read More

Rare glimpse of a black hole’s magnetic field could help us to understand how it feeds - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 12, 2017

Carole Mundell, University of Bath Encountering a black hole would be a frightening prospect for our planet. We know that these cosmic monsters ferociously devour any object that strays too close to their “event horizon” – the last chance of escape. But even though black holes drive some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, the … Read More

Book review – Science and the City - Scibooks

Guest Work Nov 22, 2017

Reviewed by Susan Rapley.  If you’re hunting for Christmas gifts for the scientific or technically inclined, Laurie Winkless’ first book Science and the City will be a must-have. Science and the City takes you on a journey (in various forms of transport) through the past, present, and future of metropolitan living.  Now New Zealand-based, Winkless has taken her own … Read More

Rockstar physicist Brian Cox coming to New Zealand - News

John Kerr Jul 31, 2017

Professor Brian Cox, one of the world’s most famous physicists and science communicators, is coming to New Zealand with a blockbuster live show.  The softly-spoken British scientist is bringing his record breaking live science show to New Zealand in November, for the first time. It will play at the ASB Theatre in Auckland on Tuesday 7 November. Lateral Events, the … Read More

Astigmatism and Amazing lenses - Physics Stop

Marcus Wilson Jul 25, 2017

There is no denying it. I am middle-aged. The latest evidence is the progressive-lens glasses. I had tried to put off getting these for as long as possible (warning to you younger readers — they are not cheap!) but it was just getting too difficult without them. We pretty-well take for granted good vision, but most of us can only enjoy … Read More