Tagged: planets

Why Mars is cold despite an atmosphere of mostly carbon dioxide - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Nov 06, 2019

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz If tiny concentrations of carbon dioxide can hold enough heat to create a global warming impact on Earth, … Read More

An invitation to name a star and a planet - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Sep 04, 2019

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) — the global organisation of professional astronomers — is marking its centenary this year by inviting different nations to propose names for both a distant star, and a planet found to orbit it (a so-called exoplanet). Anyone can suggested a moniker, for the star, for the planet, or both. So: calling all New Zealanders to … Read More

It’s crowded at the edge of the solar system   - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Jan 01, 2019

Looking out at the stars it would be easy to think that the solar system is mostly empty, bar the handful of planets circuiting the Sun and the occasional comet we see passing by. The reality, we now know, is that the edge of the solar system contains a vast population of substantial objects orbiting just beyond Neptune, one of … Read More

We’re Going Multiplanetary: The Quest for New Earths - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 29, 2018

Becky Turner Theoretical physicist and one-man-phenomenon Stephen Hawking contributed a wealth of knowledge to mankind during his lifetime. One of his recommendations was that humans would need to colonise other planets in the next hundred years to avoid annihilation. His fears took the form of deadly viruses, nuclear war, asteroid impacts, and global warming. In order to avoid … Read More

Take it from me: I’m not signing up to become a space tourist just yet… - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 11, 2018

Rowena Christiansen, University of Melbourne This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Take it from me is a new series in Science and Technology, where we find an expert to provide a personal but informed perspective on a topical issue. Elon Musk’s SpaceX reportedly has two people signed up for a … Read More

Black holes aren’t totally black, and other insights from Stephen Hawking’s groundbreaking work - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 20, 2018

Christoph Adami, Michigan State University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Mathematical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking was best known for his work exploring the relationship between black holes and quantum physics. A black hole is the remnant of a dying supermassive star that’s fallen into itself; these remnants contract … Read More

Astronomy: A Voyage of Discovery - Micro to Macro

Ryan Ridden Feb 09, 2016

Astronomy is a subject of exploration. In an age where the Earth has been charted from the Old World to the New, it almost seems like the age of great voyages of exploration and discovery have long passed. That stands true as long as you don’t look up at night. On a clear night it becomes painfully clear there is much … Read More

The long hunt for new objects in our expanding solar system - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 04, 2016

Kevin Orrman-Rossiter, University of Melbourne and Alice Gorman, Flinders University Recognise these planet names: Vulcan, Neptune, Pluto, Nemesis, Tyche and Planet X? They all have one thing in common: their existence was predicted to account for unexplained phenomena in our solar system. While the predictions of Neptune and Pluto proved correct, Nemesis and Tyche probably don’t … Read More

What would you ask a scientist?! - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Aug 27, 2015

In preparation for Queenstown Research Week, Auckland University’s Prof Peter Shepherd asked primary school kids what questions they would ask a scientist. One class at Shotover Primary School sent us this list: Edit: A group of 10-11 year olds from Wakatipu High have added to the list (Q29-48) How does the sky stay up? How does … Read More

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