Tagged: politics

For a teal coalition - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Sep 27, 2017

So. All of Left-Twitter figures that anyone wanting a blue-green coalition are either shills for National who want to destroy the Greens, because coalition would destroy the Greens, or useful idiots for those shills. Count me as one of the idiots then, because some of the objections just aren’t making sense to me – or if they are right, they … Read More

Climate change and recent actions of NZ political parties - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Sep 15, 2017

Prof Nick Wilson, Prof Richard Edwards, Dr Cristina Cleghorn, Prof Michael Baker, Dr Caroline Shaw, A/Prof Ralph Chapman, Prof Philippa Howden-Chapman The health organisation OraTaiao convened a group of experts to analyse the climate change policies of NZ political party policies. It gave the highest grade to the Green Party, then the Labour Party, and then The Opportunities Party … Read More

Why looking for aliens is good for society (even if there aren’t any) - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 27, 2017

Ian Crawford, UCL The search for life elsewhere in the universe is one of the most compelling aspects of modern science. Given its scientific importance, significant resources are devoted to this young science of astrobiology, ranging from rovers on Mars to telescopic observations of planets orbiting other stars. The holy grail of all this activity would be … Read More

New Zealanders’ population choices - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 20, 2017

The other day Statistics New Zealand released the annual data on New Zealand birth rates.  There was some coverage of the continuing drop in teen birth rates (it was what SNZ highlighted), but the chart that caught my eye was this one.     I’d been under the impression that New Zealand’s birth rate was at, or just … Read More

How to tell the difference between fact and fiction on a ‘post-truth’ internet - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal May 16, 2017

“Right now we have a health hazard to democratic functioning.” Those are the words of Professor Sam Wineberg of the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University in the United States, my guest on this edition of The Psychology Report.  You can listen to the original podcast here, as well as reading our conversation below.   Professor … Read More

To march or not to march? - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Apr 17, 2017

When I’ve marched in the past it has been to protest or celebrate.  The call for a March for Science, due to take place in New Zealand on the 22nd of April, has me confused as to its purpose. When I first heard the suggestion of a March for Science in New Zealand I admit I was immediately sceptical (occupational … Read More

Reading Creedy: Sugar tax report - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Mar 01, 2017

John Creedy is really good at using complicated maths to make simple points. I’ll summarise the simple points in Creedy’s working paper on sugar taxes, issued earlier this month. Section 2.1 shows that, whenever people enjoy a bundle of goods of various healthiness, and whenever people are likely to shift from one good to another if prices change, any … Read More

De-extinction dilemma: Bring back the moa or save the kiwi? - News

John Kerr Feb 28, 2017

Adding previously-extinct species to our conservation checklist will strain already tight conservation budgets, say a team of New Zealand and Australian scientists. Little Bush Moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis. © Te Papa. De-extinction – resurrecting extinct species with the help of modern technology – has been largely confined to the realms of sci-fi. But now technology is catching up with the fantasy. Read More