Tagged: pollination

Bird of the Year: Which birds are good for ecosystem services? - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 05, 2018

Bio-Protection Research Centre We are midway through one of the most important electoral contests of the year: Bird of the Year. Every year, this popular campaign raises awareness of New Zealand’s native birds and the perilous state many populations are in. At the Bio-Protection Research Centre we also think it’s a great opportunity to get people thinking about … Read More

Plants use advertising-like strategies to attract bees with colour and scent - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 17, 2018

Aphrodite Kantsa, University of the Aegean and Adrian Dyer, RMIT University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Watching plants and pollinators such as bees can teach us a lot about how complex networks work in nature. There are thousands of species of bees around the world, and they … Read More

Ten years after the crisis, what is happening to the world’s bees? - Guest Work

Guest Author May 08, 2017

By Simon Klein, Université de Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier and Andrew Barron, Macquarie University Ten years ago, beekeepers in the United States raised the alarm that thousands of their hives were mysteriously empty of bees. What followed was global concern over a new phenomenon: Colony Collapse Disorder. Since then we have realised that it was … Read More

Honeybee decline could sting NZ for $700m - News

John Kerr Aug 03, 2016

The pollinating power of the humble honeybee is worth millions of dollars to the New Zealand agricultural sector – but we are at risk of losing it. Bees are having a hard time of it these days; varroa mite, pesticides and a lack of plant diversity are all contributing to the decline of the bee populations crucial for pollinating crops. Read More

Parasites hijack flowers – Chief pollinators at risk - News

Erica Mather Aug 06, 2015

The spread of bee parasites has been found to be mediated by flowers, according to new research from the UK.  Infected bees deposit parasites onto flowers as they forage.  The parasites are then dispersed by other bees that visit the same flowers, and even spread between bee species.  These results reveal flowers to be ‘hotspots’ of pathogen dispersal, aiding the … Read More