Tagged: Psychology

The Journalist and the Murderer - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 17, 2018

‘Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that what he does is morally indefensible.’ This is the opening line of Janet Malcolm’s sharp, analytical book The Journalist and the Murderer. Published in 1983, the book still challenges journalists these days. Malcolm is a cunning, insightful journalist. Read More

Babies can learn the value of persistence by watching grownups stick with a challenge - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 17, 2018

Julia Leonard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. You’re at home trying to make fresh tomato sauce, but can’t seem to get the tomatoes out of their plastic container from the grocery store. The bottom latch is not opening, so you pull harder. Although you’ve never … Read More

Secrets, Spilled Soup and Schadenfreude - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 11, 2018

Imagine, if you will, a cold, blustery day in the city. With the wind howling and the rain coming down in horizontal sheets, the interior of the bus seems positively luxurious. From your vantage point on the plush red seats, you watch as a bedraggled young man runs towards the bus stop, arms flailing and suitcase flying. Just as he … Read More

Confirmation bias – we all suffer from it but how can we reduce its effect? - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Jan 10, 2018

Confirmation bias – we all suffer from it. It’s just part of being human. According to Psychology Today, Confirmation bias occurs from the direct influence of desire on beliefs. When people would like a certain idea/concept to be true, they end up believing it to be true. They are motivated by wishful thinking. This error leads the individual to … Read More

Religion may alter your psychology, even if you’re a non-believer - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 22, 2017

Brittany Cardwell and Jamin Halberstadt Sick of tinsel, carols and talk of virgin birth? In New Zealand, Australia and many other countries, it’s hard to escape Christmas in December. But even if you don’t believe in Christ or a God, religion can still be a powerful force. Research shows that even nonreligious people may hold unconscious beliefs linked … Read More

From testosterone to dogs, and physics for babies: five fascinating books in 2017 - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 20, 2017

George Aranda, Deakin University In my mild-mannered persona as an academic in science education, I teach and research ways that science can be better taught in Australia and globally. But every year I also explore the world of science books. I scope what’s new and interesting for my not-for-profit science book blog, and the Big Ideas … Read More

The psychology of Christmas shopping: how marketers nudge you to buy - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 15, 2017

Paul Harrison, Deakin University Many people see marketing as a form of manipulation, particularly around Christmas and the other retail bonanzas: Easter, Valentine’s Day, Mothers’ Day and Fathers’ Day. But rather than simply trying to trick people, the masters of marketing know it’s much easier to understand and work with innate human flaws. By drawing on a plethora … Read More

Structuring thought and imagination brick by brick, Lego is more than child’s play - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 15, 2017

Sondra Bacharach, Victoria University of Wellington You might think Lego is just a kids’ toy – one you played with as a child and now step on as you walk through the house as a parent. These days, however, the bricks are showing up in all sorts of unexpected places – on display in museums, in street art, … Read More