Tagged: Publishing

Endemic fluorosis and its health effects - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Sep 28, 2017

The public debate in New Zealand might convince the casual reader that all the science related to fluoride revolves around tooth decay and IQ. But that is certainly not the case on a world scale. The World Health Organisation gives guidelines for the concentration of fluoride in drinking water recommending it should be in the range 0.5 – 1.5 mg/L. OK, … Read More

We need more post-publication peer review - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Sep 18, 2017

We often tout peer review as the reason for accepting the veracity of published scientific studies? But how good is it really? Does it ever match the ideal picture people have of it? And what about peer review before and after publication – are we neglecting these important stages? Pre-publication peer review Here I mean the collective process of evaluating … Read More

Getting scientific research papers without paying - Code for life

Grant Jacobs May 02, 2017

Or, as it’s informally known: getting past the paywall. Occasionally I write about stuff that might be useful to other researchers, but also lets non-researchers see a little of what bugs some of us researchers! All but a relatively few (biological) science research journals require you to subscribe before you can get the research … Read More

Women aren’t failing at science — science is failing women - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 01, 2017

By Lorena Rivera León, United Nations University Female research scientists are more productive than their male colleagues, though they are widely perceived as being less so. Women are also rewarded less for their scientific achievements. That’s according to my team’s recent study for United Nations University – Merit on gender inequality in scientific research in Mexico, published as … Read More

Science in NZ: How are we doing? - News

John Kerr Nov 30, 2016

A ‘big picture’ report on the New Zealand science system shows Kiwis are pretty good at publishing top-notch research and collaborating with scientists overseas, but there is room for improvement on our business R&D spending.  The 2016 Science and Innovation System Performance Report was released yesterday by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). The report aims to give policy-makers, academics and … Read More

Is science censored? - Mere Conjecture

Jack Auty Aug 03, 2016

There was a recent piece in New Zealand news about mass governmental censorship of scientists. Starting with apocalyptic images of the Fukushima nuclear power plant incident to instill fear, they painted a picture of mass governmental meddling with scientists reporting their results, with the clear insinuation that our lives could be at risk because of this censorship. To give … Read More

We need to talk about the bad science being funded - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 20, 2016

Simon Gandevia, Neuroscience Research Australia Spectacular failures to replicate key scientific findings have been documented of late, particularly in biology, psychology and medicine. A report on the issue, published in Nature this May, found that about 90% of some 1,576 researchers surveyed now believe there is a reproducibility crisis in science. While this rightly … Read More

New editor of Journal of Royal Society of NZ - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves May 12, 2016

The journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand began its life in the 1860s covering a wide range of topics. New editor Professor Ewan Fordyce FRSNZ would like to regain a little more of that breadth of discipline. The University of Otago Professor knows something about crossing disciplinary boundaries, as a paleontologist in a Geology Department, working … Read More

Profs, publications, & social media - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 14, 2016

A while back, my Twitter feed brought up a post with the intriguing title “Prof, no-one is reading you“. The article kicks off with the following provocative statement:  Many of the world’s most talented thinkers may be university professors, but sadly most of them are not shaping today’s public debates or influencing policies. Now, them’s fighting words, but the … Read More