Tagged: research

SARS-CoV-2 – a natural event or a lab escape? - Ariadne

Robert Hickson May 16, 2021

In books and movies it is often a good plot point for a disease (or monster) to escape, accidentally or with assistance, from a government lab. There are also real cases of pathogens getting out of labs (but quickly being controlled). That’s also a discussion going on now about Covid-19. Natural evolution or human agency? Spillover or … Read More

we haven’t taught critical thinking particularly well - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Apr 14, 2021

  Yesterday I got told to “do some research” &, by extension, to think critically. The biologist in me cringed a little when I read it (and not because of the advice about doing research). Biology teachers I know suggested that perhaps everyone should take the NCEA standard that lets students learn about the basic genetics that … Read More

Indigenous scholars struggle to be heard in the mainstream. Here’s how journal editors and reviewers can help - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 12, 2021

Apisalome Movono, Massey University; Anna Carr; Emma Hughes, Massey University; Freya Higgins-Desbiolles, University of South Australia; Jeremy William Hapeta, Massey University; Regina Scheyvens, Massey University, and Rochelle Stewart-Withers, Massey University In the world of research and scholarship, being published in academic journals is crucial to both the advancement of knowledge and the careers of those involved. In particular, the peer … Read More

New Year of Ocean Mapping, Two Voyages Aboard the R/V Falkor - Field Work

Guest Author Feb 10, 2021

Alysha Johnson Tēnā koutou! My name is Alysha Johnson, and I am a PhD student at the University of Wollongong studying the geomorphic evolution of volcanic islands, seamounts and guyots. I was lucky enough to join the crew and scientists aboard the R/V Falkor with Schmidt Ocean Institute on their ‘Pinging in the New Year’ expedition running from 28th December … Read More

A Big Science Publisher Is Going Open Access. But at What Cost? - News

Guest Author Jan 15, 2021

Grigori Guitchounts In November, Springer Nature, one of the world’s largest publishers of scientific journals, made an attention-grabbing announcement: More than 30 of its most prestigious journals, including the flagship Nature, will now allow authors to pay a fee of US$11,390 to make their papers freely available for anyone to read online. This move, by a company that … Read More

Better understanding bacterial blooms in New Zealand waterways - Genomics Aotearoa

Genomics Aotearoa Jul 13, 2020

Dr Kim Handley, University of Auckland Just how do cyanobacteria live in their natural habitat, and how do they coexist with other bacteria and microbial life forms? And what difference will knowledge on this bacteria have on maintaining New Zealand’s water quality? One of the consequences of declining water quality is an increase in cyanobacteria – these are photosynthetic bacteria … Read More

Coronavirus ‘infodemic’ - Lately, In Science

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Feb 03, 2020

Lately, my morning routine includes opening up our work email and checking the latest World Health Organization coronavirus situation report. It’s sobering to see the numbers increasing so rapidly – about 2,500 new confirmed cases every day and about 45 reported deaths. But I’m also reminded of the stark contrast between this outbreak and previous situations in terms of how … Read More

Science prizes are still a boys’ club. Here’s how we can change that - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 22, 2019

Justine Shaw, The University of Queensland and Vanessa Wong, Monash University This year, five of the seven Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science were awarded to women. While this is a welcome development, the great majority of awards and prizes for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in Australia still go to men. Our research has identified some of the key … Read More

Measles & cancer, part 2 - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Sep 09, 2019

I’ve written previously about an anti-vaxx plague enthusiast claim that measles can cure cancer (it doesn’t). However, it seems that the search for positive attributes for a measles infection knows little bounds. Thus a friend shared this with me – it’s something posted by an antivaxxer in a FB thread: Presumably this is an example of having … Read More