Tagged: science

Why do students need to learn about the nature of science? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 25, 2020

You’re probably aware that the Achievement Standards used to assess senior school students’ learning are being reviewed. Science is one of the ‘pilot’ subjects in this process, where a ‘Subject Expert Group’ has developed 4 draft Science standards¹ (a significant step away from the current 30+, and a response to advice from several high-level advisory groups). These drafts … Read More

Science in the 20’s – part 2 - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Feb 02, 2020

  Will the 2020’s be a case of, to borrow the words of the illustrious Martian botanist Mark Watney,  “sciencing the sh*t” out of the big problems facing us? In some cases yes. In some cases no, because it isn’t science that is missing. In many other cases, maybe. If we can improve the system. Read More

The 2019-nCov coronavirus outbreak: all together now - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Feb 01, 2020

There’s so much being reported about the ‘Wuhan’ 2019-nCov coronavirus outbreak it’s confusing. Here’s an outline of some aspects of what scientists are looking at, some places to follow the story, and a few tips for reading the science. Yesterday Tedros Ghebreyesus, the Director General of the World Health Organisation (WHO) wrote, calling for a public health emergency – … Read More

BIG idea physics - Physics Stop

Marcus Wilson Jan 21, 2020

This morning I’ve been having a quick look through some documentation from The Ministry of Education on proposed changes to NCEA Level 1 Science. For those not familiar with the NZ secondary education system, a typical student would complete NCEA level 1 at the end of year 11.  In this regard, it’s broadly similar to the English GCSE process, though … Read More

Science in the ’20s – part 1 - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Jan 15, 2020

  Outrageous, immoral or downright dangerous. That’s a description of the lifestyle of women “flappers” in the 1920s. Could it apply to science (and scientists) in the 2020s? Actually, you could look back at the past decade and see those, or similar terms, used about some science and scientists. Sometimes justifiably, most times not. Looking ahead ten … Read More

How I came to be writing Wikipedia biographies for female New Zealand professors - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 18, 2019

Stuart Yeates In August 2017, the Royal Society Te Apārangi provided physical space and some funds for a group of people to get together and edit Wikipedia on topics related to Women in Science, to try and combat the overwhelming maleness on Wikipedia. Participants at the Women in Science Wikipedia workshop, Wellington, New Zealand, 6 August 2017 #WikiSciWomen. Read More

Anti-neutrinos–When you are your own opposite - Physics Stop

Marcus Wilson Nov 28, 2019

Around a million billion pass through you each second, almost all originating from our sun, but few of them are likely to interact with you enroute. I was reading in a physics magazine earlier in the week about the nature of neutrinos. These are extremely numerous elementary particles, but only interact very weakly with anything.  A typical neutrino will travel … Read More

1000 of these now - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Nov 09, 2019

Some days I sit and think, “what will I write…?” What do you say when you get to 1000 posts? Maybe you just start where you are, diverge to where this all began, then offer a collection of reader’s favourite posts, and a few of your own? (And throw in a few pictures.) Slow to fall This piece started a … Read More

Science prizes are still a boys’ club. Here’s how we can change that - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 22, 2019

Justine Shaw, The University of Queensland and Vanessa Wong, Monash University This year, five of the seven Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science were awarded to women. While this is a welcome development, the great majority of awards and prizes for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in Australia still go to men. Our research has identified some of the key … Read More