Tagged: science communication

Matariki, history and ethnicity research honoured - Mātau Taiao

Katherine Hurst Nov 19, 2020

Every year Royal Society Te Apārangi celebrates the achievements of researchers, scholars, and kairangahau who have achieved excellence in their disciplines throughout Aotearoa. This year separate ceremonies were held in the three main centres. In the first of two posts, we highlight the Māori and Pasifika recipients from the Auckland and Christchurch ceremonies. Read More

The SMC Video Competition: Ecological Cluedo - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 30, 2020

Recently, the Science Media Centre ran the third round of its 2020 SAVVY Video Competition for science researchers. With entries ranging from kea tracking to Beethoven’s piano pieces, we judges were incredibly impressed by the creativity and quality of submissions. This week, we’re featuring the work of the winner, conservation biologist Bridgette Farnworth. Our streams and lakebeds host … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: The Tītipounamu Project - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 09, 2020

Recently, the Science Media Centre ran the third round of its 2020 SAVVY Video Competition for science researchers. With entries ranging from kea tracking to Beethoven’s piano pieces, we judges were incredibly impressed by the creativity and quality of submissions. This week, we’re featuring the work of runner-up, PhD candidate Yen Yi Loo. When I introduce myself … Read More

Tuhia ki te rangi: a new space for student science communication - Tuhia ki te rangi

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Sep 09, 2020

Nau mai, haere mai – welcome to our newest addition to Sciblogs: Tuhia ki te rangi. Over the eleven years Sciblogs has been operating, the face of science communication has changed dramatically. Where a decade ago there was a burgeoning number of scientists and other experts looking to stretch their wings in science blogging, now there is a growing establishment … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: The Science of Bellringing - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 04, 2020

Recently, the Science Media Centre ran the first round of its 2020 SAVVY Video Competition for science researchers. With twelve entries, ranging from infant nutrition to the science of bell-ringing, we judges were incredibly impressed by the creativity and quality of submissions. This week, we’re featuring the work of runner-up prize winner, MA student Scott Pilkington. My name is … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: The DREAM Study - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 27, 2020

Recently, the Science Media Centre ran the first round of its 2020 SAVVY Video Competition for science researchers. With twelve entries, ranging from infant nutrition to the science of bell-ringing, we judges were incredibly impressed by the creativity and quality of submissions. This week, we’re featuring the work of runner-up prize winner, Dr Cherie Stayner. Introducing the Diet, … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: The Science of Camouflage - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 21, 2020

Recently, the Science Media Centre ran the first round of its 2020 SAVVY Video Competition for science researchers. With twelve entries, ranging from infant nutrition to the science of bell-ringing, we judges were incredibly impressed by the creativity and quality of submissions. This week, we’re featuring the work of first place prize winner, PhD candidate Morgane Merien. My name … Read More

When debunking is just so tempting - Lately, In Science

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Aug 13, 2020

As New Zealand holds its breath waiting to find out the extent of the latest cases of COVID-19 community transmission, it’s hard to avoid the growing amount of mis- and dis-information online. It’s a very natural instinct to want to debunk this misinformation, but unfortunately, science communication theory shows that not only does this not work, it can be harmful. Read More

When jargon makes you feel like you don’t belong - Lately, In Science

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Mar 06, 2020

It’s the cruellest Catch-22 in science: you spend years learning intricate jargon about your specific area, then this jargon makes it nearly impossible for ‘outsiders’ to understand what you’re on about. Anyone who has submitted a blog to Sciblogs in the past few years has probably received an email back from me pleading for them to remove or explain jargon. Read More

Grammar for scientists - Lately, In Science

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Feb 05, 2020

I’m about to start teaching science communication to tertiary students, which is equally hilarious and terrifying to me. (Hi to my students who have Googled me and found this post.) I loved English at high school, but we spent most of our time reading The Outsiders, discussing the differences between metaphors and similes, and pondering the thematic meaning of King Lear. But … Read More