Tagged: sleep

Night owls may have 10 percent higher risk of early death, study says - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 24, 2018

Kristen Knutson, Northwestern University and Malcolm von Schantz, University of Surrey This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Do you wake up bright eyed and bushy-tailed, greeting the sunrise with cheer and vigor? Or are you up late into the night and dread the sound of your alarm clock? … Read More

Drug use can have social benefits, and acknowledging this could improve rehabilitation - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 04, 2018

Jennifer Power, La Trobe University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Illicit drug use is often framed in terms of risk and antisocial or criminal behaviour. But drug use is often a highly social activity. For many people, the pleasure of using drugs is about social connection as much … Read More

Yawn! Social jetlag is associated with decreased academic performance - News

Jean Balchin Mar 30, 2018

As a perpetually exhausted university student, I wake every morning to the shrill sound of my alarm clock, and curse myself for embarking on a course of tertiary education. Only yesterday I woke up at 7am to cram for an exam the same morning. It was a nightmare. I drank two coffees, gobbled down a chocolate bar, and executed a … Read More

When we lose weight, where does it go? - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 15, 2018

Ruben Meerman, UNSW and Andrew Brown, UNSW This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The world is obsessed with fad diets and weight loss, yet few of us know how a kilogram of fat actually vanishes off the scales. Even the 150 doctors, dietitians and personal trainers we surveyed … Read More

Wearable technologies help Olympians achieve top performance - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 16, 2018

Jaci VanHeest, University of Connecticut This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. As Fitbits and other wearable activity monitors change how regular people exercise and track their activity, they’re having similar effects on how Olympians train and recover between workouts. It’s long been common for coaches to use video … Read More

Sleepwalking, Sex, and Murder: Part Three - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 10, 2018

Parts One and Two can be read here… On a warm summer evening in July 2008, retiree Brian Thomas and his wife Christine sat their campervan, watching the sun sink into the sea. The couple spent their retirement watching rugby together and traveling the countryside. After heading to bed, Brian and Christine were awoken at … Read More

Science Tank | Jet Debt - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 20, 2017

Jet lag arises due to a disturbance of your body’s internal clock, which drives your circadian rhythms. Known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus, this ‘master clock’ processes light information from your retinas and tells the pineal gland what’s happening, so that it can adjust melatonin production, effectively controlling your sleep patterns (when your brain thinks it’s dark, it … Read More

Why our brain needs sleep, and what happens if we don’t get enough of it - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 20, 2017

Leonie Kirszenblat, The University of Queensland Many of us have experienced the effects of sleep deprivation: feeling tired and cranky, or finding it hard to concentrate. Sleep is more important for our brains than you may realise. Although it may appear you’re “switching off” when you fall asleep, the brain is far from inactive. What we know from … Read More

Sleep paralysis – more common than you might think - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal Apr 07, 2017

In this week’s Psychology Report, I talked with Associate Professor Dr Brian Sharpless of the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Northern Virginia, USA. Brian is interested in unusual disorders, and for this show, we are talking about sleep paralysis. You can listen to the original podcast here, as well as reading our conversation below. Read More