Tagged: Society

Futures Fatigue and Futures Inertia - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Feb 18, 2020

Nobody thinks about the next century anymore. That at least is Sci-Fi writer William Gibson’s observation (in this BBC 4 short interview, starting at 1:43:50 ). He calls it “Futures Fatigue”, but isn’t judgemental about it. Gibson notes that in the 20th century speculation about the 21st (and beyond) was common. Now the focus is much more … Read More

Transitioning - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Dec 31, 2019

Two things you can guarantee at this time of the year. Predictions about the coming year, and days at the beach (only lightly polluted, hopefully). Futures thinking is often seen as identifying the “next big thing” – technology and consumer trends. But that’s surface level futuring. Wave spotting. As a first step in raising awareness of change … Read More

1000 of these now - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Nov 09, 2019

Some days I sit and think, “what will I write…?” What do you say when you get to 1000 posts? Maybe you just start where you are, diverge to where this all began, then offer a collection of reader’s favourite posts, and a few of your own? (And throw in a few pictures.) Slow to fall This piece started a … Read More

Climate change – determination over despair - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Sep 19, 2019

  There is much to be despondent about looking ahead to the consequences of a changing climate. But adopting Jonathan Franzen’s defeatism isn’t the best response. Reducing adverse impacts of climate change isn’t as simple as regulating automotive emissions, banning a pesticide of refrigerant, or changing to LED lights. But nor is it as … Read More

Future nation - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Mar 22, 2019

Two centuries ago there was an allegory doing the rounds of England. A “New Zealander” – meaning a Māori  – at some latter date sat drawing the ruins of London. A sign that all great cities and civilisations eventually diminish and others take their place.   Detail from Gustave Doré. “The New Zealander” in London: … Read More

It’s not my fault, my brain implant made me do it… - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 17, 2018

Laura Y. Cabrera, Michigan State University and Jennifer Carter-Johnson, Michigan State University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Mr. B loves Johnny Cash, except when he doesn’t. Mr. X has watched his doctors morph into Italian chefs right before his eyes. The link between the two? … Read More

You’re more likely to bet the farm if your friends do too - News

Jean Balchin Apr 13, 2018

A recent study in Scientific Reports suggests that being in the presence of peers (such as friends, coworkers or acquaintances) who engage in risky behaviours may have an influence on individual choices. In a laboratory task led by Livia Tomova and Luiz Pessoa, participants who knew of riskier behaviour taken by their peers, tended to make riskier choices themselves. However, observing safe … Read More

If music be the food of love, play on - News

Jean Balchin Jan 26, 2018

From the frosty swathes of Iceland to the deep forests of Aotearoa, music may be heard reverberating through every culture and peoples. Songs serve many different purposes, as we all know; accompanying a dance, soothing an infant, or expressing love. A recent study in Current Biology wherein recordings were analysed from all over the world reveals that vocal songs sharing one of … Read More

Religion may alter your psychology, even if you’re a non-believer - Guest Work

Guest Author Dec 22, 2017

Brittany Cardwell and Jamin Halberstadt Sick of tinsel, carols and talk of virgin birth? In New Zealand, Australia and many other countries, it’s hard to escape Christmas in December. But even if you don’t believe in Christ or a God, religion can still be a powerful force. Research shows that even nonreligious people may hold unconscious beliefs linked … Read More