Tagged: space

Launching in May, the InSight mission will measure marsquakes to explore the interior of Mars - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 30, 2018

Katarina Miljkovic, Curtin University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. When we look up at Mars in the night sky we see a red planet – largely due to its rusty surface. But what’s on the inside? Launching in May, the next NASA space mission will study the interior … Read More

Take it from me: I’m not signing up to become a space tourist just yet… - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 11, 2018

Rowena Christiansen, University of Melbourne This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Take it from me is a new series in Science and Technology, where we find an expert to provide a personal but informed perspective on a topical issue. Elon Musk’s SpaceX reportedly has two people signed up for a … Read More

60 years in orbit for ‘grapefruit satellite’ – the oldest human object in space - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 22, 2018

Alice Gorman, Flinders University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Sixty years ago, a grapefruit-sized aluminium sphere with six antennas and some tiny solar cells was launched into Earth orbit. The Vanguard 1 satellite is still up there and is the oldest human-made object in space. It’s our first … Read More

Explainer: why you can hear gravitational waves when things collide in the universe - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 14, 2018

David Blair, University of Western Australia This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Whenever there’s an announcement of a new discovery of gravitational waves there is usually an accompanying sound, such as this: We have only detected half a dozen signals so far. The first five are black holes whose … Read More

Jupiter: scientists spot pentagon pattern of cyclones – and unlock secrets of the planet’s interior - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 09, 2018

Andrew Coates, UCL This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. We all recognise Jupiter by its banded pattern of counter-rotating zones and belts – this can be seen even with small garden telescopes. These stunning structures are powered by fast jet streams that are visible in the planet’s clouds. But what … Read More

Science Tank | Einstein - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 22, 2017

“When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute. But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute – and it’s longer than any hour. That’s relativity.” – Albert Einstein This guy kind of needs no introduction but, while most people know that he was a total genius, they don’t really … Read More

Meteor shower to hit New Zealand skies - News

John Kerr Oct 20, 2017

Earth is passing through a cloud of comet debris and there’s good chance to catch meteors lighting up the New Zealand sky – weather permitting! Kiwis will witness the peak of the annual Orionids meteor shower tonight – at least those who are committed to getting up early (or staying up late) and who have the luxury of a clear night. The shower is … Read More

Cassini plunges into Saturn tonight – a grand finale - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Sep 15, 2017

After two decades in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft is nearing the end of its remarkable journey of exploration. Having expended almost every bit of the rocket propellant it carried to Saturn, operators are deliberately plunging Cassini into the planet to ensure Saturn’s moons will remain pristine for future exploration. Watch live coverage of Cassini’s end of mission on … Read More