Tagged: space

Proxima b: the Earth next door? - News

John Kerr Aug 25, 2016

The astronomy world is abuzz following the discovery of a planet in a neighboring star system, sitting in just the right position to – theoretically – host liquid water.  It is still over four light years away, but the planet Proxima b in the Alpha Centauri system is the closest Earth-like planet we’ve found. The discovery is published today in the journal Nature. Read More

Powering potential in young Māori - Mātau Taiao

Laura Goodall May 19, 2016

Teachers have been shown to underestimate Māori children’s academic capabilities, which their achievements end up reflecting. But Pūhoro, a forward-thinking science academy, has now been set up to support Māori youth in reaching their true potential. Naomi Manu and Mana Vautier give us the lowdown. One thing that people really don’t like to talk about is prejudice. But we all have … Read More

Want to build a moon base? Easy. Just print it - Guest Work

Guest Work May 18, 2016

By Morgan Saletta, University of Melbourne Planetary Resources, a company hoping to make asteroid mining into a trillion dollar industry, earlier this year unveiled the world’s first 3D printed object made from bits of an asteroid. 3D printing, and additive manufacturing processes more generally, have made many advances in recent years. Just a few years … Read More

Kepler finds more ‘Earth-like planets’, but are they really like Earth? - Guest Work

Guest Work May 13, 2016

By Jonti Horner, University of Southern Queensland The number of confirmed planets orbiting other stars has just jumped by 1,284 with NASA’s new analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope. That takes the total number of known exoplanets to 3,264, with more than two-thirds (2,325) having been found by this one incredible space observatory alone. Read More

Bacteria found to thrive better in space than on Earth - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 29, 2016

Ivy Shih, The Conversation Some species of bacteria have made themselves right at home in space, with one species, Bacillus safensis, found to thrive more in the microgravity of the International Space Station than here on Earth. The study was a product of Project MECCURI, a citizen science project where members of the public and microbiologists collected … Read More

Could humans hibernate? - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 16, 2016

Vladyslav Vyazovskiy, University of Oxford On cold, dark days it is tempting to imagine shutting yourself away until the warmer weather returns. Many animals do just that by entering a state known as torpor, which reduces their bodily functions to a minimum and uses fat stores in their body for energy. Could humans ever hibernate in the same … Read More

Astronaut’s return to Earth will prepare us for mission to Mars - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 03, 2016

Kathryn Harriss, University of Kent Would you like to spend a year gazing down from the International Space Station? Before you pack your bag, you should think about what actually might happen to you in microgravity, away from the protection of the atmosphere and magnetosphere. Thanks to two astronauts who’ve recently landed back on Earth, we’ll now be … Read More

Consenting and rocket science - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Nov 24, 2015

Looks like Christchurch has lost its shot at a space-port. Rocket Lab is moving its proposed launch facility from Birdlings Flat out to the Mahia Peninsula. They’ve cited slow Christchurch resource consenting as one of the reasons. Auckland-based Rocket Lab said its decision was partly due to the time it was taking to get the necessary resource consent from Christchurch … Read More