Tagged: sugar

Better health and diet well before conception results in healthier pregnancies - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 24, 2018

Gita Mishra, The University of Queensland and Judith Stephenson, UCL This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Maternal and child health in Australia, like most countries, has traditionally focused on health during pregnancy and in the early years of life. But this approach may be missing a key opportunity … Read More

Eric Crampton on the sugar tax and Otago’s response - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Apr 06, 2018

Otago’s public health people, perhaps unsurprisingly, didn’t like NZIER’s take on sugar taxes. They’ve blogged on it here, but they seem to have missed a few important points. A Report commissioned by the Ministry of Health, written by NZIER, has recently been getting air-time as an argument against taxing sugary drinks.  However, the Report seems to us to be … Read More

And now the Brits are doing it: A sugary drink tax levy on the industry - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Apr 03, 2018

Prof Tony Blakely, Prof Nick Wilson, Dr Anja Mizdrak, Dr Cristina Cleghorn From 1 April 2018, the UK is putting in place a type of sugary drinks tax – actually a “soft drinks industry levy”. This blog reviews how they are doing it, early signs of its success, and ponders its relevance for NZ.  We also take this opportunity to … Read More

Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 13, 2018

Kieron Rooney, University of Sydney This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The World Health Organisation recommends limiting “free sugars” to less than 10% of our total energy intake. This equates to around 12 teaspoons a day for an average adult. But more than half of Australian adults exceed … Read More

Why telling people they could get sick in the future won’t persuade them to be healthy now - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 22, 2018

Adam Bulley, The University of Queensland and Thomas Suddendorf, The University of Queensland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Everyone knows smoking, consuming too much sugar and drinking too much alcohol will harm our long-term health – but many of us do these things anyway. Why? Of course, … Read More

Mexican soda and sweet storable substitutes - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Mar 02, 2017

A couple more important points on the Mexican soda tax,  which I discussed in relation to a recent report on sugar taxes in New Zealand. First from the comments on Tuesday’s post: Mexicans also love to drink uncarbonated sugary drinks, like horchata, and drink more of those now carbonated beverages are more dear. Much of that market doesn’t go … Read More

Reading Creedy: Sugar tax report - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Mar 01, 2017

John Creedy is really good at using complicated maths to make simple points. I’ll summarise the simple points in Creedy’s working paper on sugar taxes, issued earlier this month. Section 2.1 shows that, whenever people enjoy a bundle of goods of various healthiness, and whenever people are likely to shift from one good to another if prices change, any … Read More

Analysis of a new NZ Treasury Report on soft drink tax - Public Health Expert

Public Health Expert Feb 28, 2017

By Professors Tony Blakely, Nick Wilson, Boyd Swinburn and Cliona Ni Mhurchu The Government has an action plan to tackle childhood obesity, but it lacks a tax on sugary drinks – a strategy for which there is good evidence.  A new Treasury Report on soft drink tax price elasticities has just emerged. It has the look of a strategically published … Read More

Why the government should tax unhealthy foods and subsidise nutritious ones - Guest Work

Guest Author Feb 16, 2017

by Linda Cobiac, University of Melbourne; Lennert Veerman, Cancer Council NSW, and Tony Blakely, University of Melbourne In an Australian study published today, we show that if the government were to combine taxes and subsidies on a range of foods and beverages, it could substantially improve the health of Australians and potentially free up … Read More